Peppermint OS Community Forum

General => GNU/Linux Discussion => Topic started by: perknh on July 29, 2014, 06:11:32 pm

Title: "If You Want To Learn Linux Install, Slackware."
Post by: perknh on July 29, 2014, 06:11:32 pm
I've heard this said from a source unknown, "If you want to learn Debian, install Debian. If you want to learn Fedora, install Fedora. If you want to learn Linux, install Slackware.”

I'm wondering is there really is some bottom-line distribution to use -- that when you learn it, you actually comprehend Linux, some distribution with which everything begins to click?

I've read also that these are the great learning distributions:  Arch, Debian, and Gentoo.

Personally, I feel greatly rewarded from what I've learned here at Peppermint -- thanks to lots and lots of time, patience, and help from the members of this forum.  But, still I see commands I've never used, and I often read about issues within this forum of which I've never considered.

My thought has been this, and somebody correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't Peppermint OS as much Linux as any other distribution?  Still sometimes I think I should start with a black command line screen, start with nearly nothing but a LUI, and then try to build a workable distribution almost from scratch.  If so, is Slackware the most basic distribution to learn?  Is it now the oldest distribution in the world of Linux, and therefore the most foundational Linux OS to learn?  Or is Core Linux really the most basic Linux OS these days?

Thank you, 

perknh

 :-\
Title: Re: "If You Want To Learn Linux Install, Slackware."
Post by: PCNetSpec on July 29, 2014, 08:18:30 pm
No doubt written by a Slackware fan .. they can tend to be a vocal bunch ;)
(I tend to find there are 2 types of Slackware user .. the extremely knowledgeable, friendly, and helpful,type that feel no need to say things like that, and the vocal "look at me I managed to get Slackware running so now I'm gonna make sure the whole world knows about it" type)

Sure there are 2 ways to learn building a car.....

a) start with a bag of bits and a book, and figure it out as you go.

or

b) start with a car and take it apart, and put it back together, learning as you go

if you like the idea of (a) .. why not go crazy and even machine your own parts (think Gentoo or LFS) :)

Sometimes it's as much about bragging rights as anything else .. but just because you built your linux from a bag of bits and a book doesn't necessarily mean you learned anything along the way, it could just mean you're good at following instructions.

Linux is Linux .. learn with whichever distro and whichever method suits YOU, and don't listen to everything Slackware fans (or any other fans) say, no matter how often and loudly. ;)
Title: Re: "If You Want To Learn Linux Install, Slackware."
Post by: 10i on July 30, 2014, 12:14:50 pm
Peppermint is Linux, it's based / built upon Debian, meaning you are running a tweaked version of Debian.

Learning how to do things in Debian, would not be a bad thing either.

I am trying to learn how to do things via the command line, that way I am learning how Debian works - without having the reinstall anything :)

hth
Title: Re: "If You Want To Learn Linux Install, Slackware."
Post by: perknh on July 30, 2014, 05:06:55 pm
Hello 10i,.

I like Debian too, and I feel very much at home with Debian.  I've played with Sparky Linux a little, and MX14, which is pretty cool too.  I've even tried playing with Crunchbang some, but I always come home here after having learned something during my wanderings.  :)

I don't know many commands either.  I know how to update, upgrade, dist-upgrade, remove, purge, and create a default firewall, but that's really about it.  After that I just copy and paste whatever commands I need.

openSUSE looks pretty cool, and I've heard that Linus Torvalds uses Fedora Xfce, so I thought I should look at that one day too, but that's about all I've done.  Oh, a little Majaro, but not much, and I've looked at all the Ubuntus except Kubuntu.

I believe that what PCNetSpec said above is worth reading several times.  It's all Linux: what we need to do is find, and use, what works best for us.  ;)

But, both you and PCNetSpec got me thinking.  I would like to learn more commands too.  But the funny thing is, I still haven't found a more user-friendly  distribution than Peppermint OS.  And, for me, the forum is every bit as important as the OS itself.  And I've yet to find a nicer forum, with a more knowledgeable, or with a more considerate group of people,  than Peppermint forum.  An OS without a good forum just doesn't cut it for me.

My wife and I both have Peppermint on our laptops, and both of us are using Firefox as our default browser.  Peppermint 5 is working for us like a charm.  But I do have this urge to learn more about Linux.  Your idea of learning Debian commands are as good a place to begin as anywhere, I suspect.

Linux sure is interesting in and of itself.

Thank you, 10i!

perknh

Title: Re: "If You Want To Learn Linux Install, Slackware."
Post by: 10i on August 01, 2014, 02:48:37 pm
It's a pleasure. I recently tried a different distro again, one day later I reinstalled Peppermint 5. It is a great forum and a great distro.

Check places like www.linux.com/learn and training.linuxfoundation.com/free-linux-training

I like reading fullcirclemagazine.org
Title: Re: "If You Want To Learn Linux Install, Slackware."
Post by: perknh on August 01, 2014, 04:16:24 pm
Thank you, 10i.  I've bookmarked the link you gave me.  And I'll bookmark the other link too.  I had never heard of either before.

I'm, too, have decided to study Debian.  I downloaded Slackware, but it was too big of a distribution for my tastes.  Fortunately I had an error message installing it, so I never lost Peppermint for a moment.  The moment I saw all the programs it was installing, I said to myself, "This is not for me."

I'm going to study Crunchbang 11 Bootcamp 2013, on YouTube, by PuppyLinuxWorld.  And I'm sure there are even other series on Crunchbang, perhaps even by the same man that are just as good, and worthy of exploration.  Crunchbang is Debian-based, so either one of us ought to be enough in our comfort zone when learning about it.  And I don't see how learning about Debian will do us anything other than good when we are running our Peppermint OS.  I'm going to put Crunchbang on my external hard drive, and keep Peppermint right here on my internal hard drive where it belongs.

Here's the link to Crunchbang Bootcamp.  It looks pretty cool:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=arzICLgqiUs (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=arzICLgqiUs)

And thank you for the educational and training links to Linux.
Title: Re: "If You Want To Learn Linux Install, Slackware."
Post by: PCNetSpec on August 01, 2014, 05:46:42 pm
http://linuxcommand.org/

http://www.linux-tutorial.info/

http://linux-bible.com/

There's tons of em :)
Title: Re: "If You Want To Learn Linux Install, Slackware."
Post by: perknh on August 02, 2014, 02:40:14 pm
Thank you, PCNetSpec.  I've bookmarked your suggestions too.

Although I'm going through Crunchbang Boot camp, I've had my fair share of difficulty with Crunchbang itself.

Crunchbang is based on Debian's stable platform called Wheezy , and I want to use Debian's testing platform called Jessie.  Well, after upgrading to Jessie, my username and password no longer work within Crunchbang.  So I don't know how far I'll get with all of this.  (And since this a Peppermint forum, I'm not requesting help here.  I'm just reporting in!)  My problem with Crunchbang, or Debian in general, is that I always like to use an updated browser.  Having an updated browser is something I consider important, and IceWeasel, in the stable version of Crunchbang, is seven versions behind our Firefox browser in the Ubuntu-based distributions.  Seven versions behind!  Well, I don't like that very much.  And, besides, version 31 works a whole lot better than version 24.  So, that's where I am at at this point with my explorations within the world of Debian.  But the YouTube video series Crunchbang Boot Camp has some good insights and tips worth learning.  The videos are short and helpful.  And much of the information found within the Crunchbang videos is transferable to here.  Debian and Ubuntu-based distributions are closely related; so that's why much information gleaned from Crunchbang Bootcamp can be applied back here in Peppermint.
Title: Re: "If You Want To Learn Linux Install, Slackware."
Post by: rjm65 on August 02, 2014, 03:05:52 pm
Why would someone name a distro Crunchbang , every time I hear that name I want to go eat a bowl of cereal, it reminds me of snap crackle and pop....  LOL   :D
Title: Re: "If You Want To Learn Linux Install, Slackware."
Post by: AndyInMokum on August 02, 2014, 05:38:06 pm
Hi perknh how's it going?  I was using Crunchbang 11 "Wheezy" before Peppermint.  It is really fantastic.  Technically, it is Debian made "sexy".   It is the Porche of the Debian world.  It is one of the best distos to learn about what's, "under the hood".  You will get your hands dirty and its fun  :).  Have you considered dual booting Crunchbang with Peppermint?  In addition, you'll find the Crunchbang community extremely friendly and helpful; very reminiscent of our awesome Peppermint gang  8)!  Debian is just another way of saying, "Ultra Stable".  Than is why many of the packages may seem old.  For the Debian bunch, it just means they are ready to use.  If you want more up to date packages, you can always backport to the, "Sid", (unstable) repositories.  This kind of like using a ppa Debian style.  Crunchbang helped me understand a huge amount about Linux in general.  I will use Crunchbang again when I find another laptop that needs resurrecting.  Good luck and have fun  ;).
Title: Re: "If You Want To Learn Linux Install, Slackware."
Post by: perknh on August 02, 2014, 06:43:11 pm
Hello rjm65, it makes us here in the U.S. think of Captain Crunch, doesn't it!  ;D

Since I had problems with the Jessie version of Crunchbang, I went and installed Sparky Linux LXDE to my external hard drive.  Sparky Linux is based on Jessie, or Debian's testing distribution.  Sparky Linux LXDE is very nice -- similar to Peppermint in many ways -- but with more programs than most of us here would want or need.  And I'm still watching the Crunchbang Bootcamp videos.

I'd say Sparky Linux would be good for older computers that don't handle Chrome, or Chromium browsers, very well.  From what I can see, the trick with Sparky Linux is first to turn off the screensaver, then update, then dist-update, then turn on the screensaver again if you want it.  I removed the Kbar which is like Docky, and I removed apt-xapian-index and python-xapian as well.  It's a nice OS out of Poland, and it has a lock screen feature near the logout button which could be handy for some people who need a computer with a fast default privacy feature.

perknh
Title: Re: "If You Want To Learn Linux Install, Slackware."
Post by: perknh on August 02, 2014, 07:13:30 pm
Hello, AndyInMokum!

I got your message while writing to rjm65.  Yes, I am dual booting with my external hard drive.  I have Peppermint 5 on my internal hard drive, and I can put whatever Linux OS I want on my external hard drive.  When I boot up, I am given an option to use either OS -- which is a pretty nice way to have things.

No, I did not know about the "Sid" or the unstable repositories.  But I do have a soft spot for in my heart for Crunchbang.  Why?  Well, one night I tried putting Crunchbang onto a flash drive, but I placed Crunchbang's bootloader (GRUB) on my internal hard drive by mistake.  Well, I'm sure you know what happened.  I ended up with Crunchbang on my internal hard drive instead of Windows.  Since I didn't have an inkling at the time with what I was doing, I really thought I had destroyed my computer.  I even confessed to my wife I had totally destroyed our computer!  Well, six hours later, and at 4:00 in the morning, I had (and I don't know how I did it) Manjaro Xfce on the computer.  Now my wife needs the computer in the morning, but since I had configured Manjaro to the point where it looked almost identical to our desktop configuration for Windows, and since she moves so quickly in the morning, she hadn't noticed that she wasn't using Windows.

I said to myself, "Yes!"  And, you better believe I considered that experience to have been a major score!  :)

AndyInMokum, that mistake with Crunchbang was the best mistake I had ever made with a computer in my life.  And, over time, and because of that one mistake, we are now a Linux-only household.  And, yes, I have Crunchbang (the Porsche of the Debian world) to thank for that wonderful, life-changing mistake I made not all that long ago. 

AndyInMokum, all I want with Crunchbang is an updated IceWeasel, or Firefox, browser. I'd be fine with Crunchbang in Wheezy, but when I dist-upgraded to Jessie, I lost my ability to sign in.  I became essentially locked out of Crunchbang .  I even tried going outside the repository to install Firefox, but I couldn't figure out how to do so.  I could download it, but I couldn't install it.  And I don't what to use Chromium if I can avoid it.

I will now learn about Crunchbang's unstable repositories.  They sound like my cup of tea.

Thank you for that very helpful insight.

perknh


Title: Re: "If You Want To Learn Linux Install, Slackware."
Post by: AndyInMokum on August 02, 2014, 07:51:05 pm
Hi perknh, I've also played around with Manjaro.  It was the OpenBox spin of it.  One word - "Slick".  The guys at Manjaro have done an awesome job.  They really have put some "spit and polish" into this distro.  I think the way they delay pacman updates for extra testing is brilliant.  It is great how you can choose from, stable, testing and unstable repositories so easily too.  It really is, "Arch for the masses" and very cool it is too  8)!

I had Manjaro dual booting with both my Peppermint and Crunchbang installations.  I biggest issue I had was, if I didn't use it really frequently, I would get way behind with updates.  Things rapidly went pear shaped because of this.  I would really like a separate laptop to run Manjaro full time.  That way, I could apply updates in a more timely manner and minimize things going wrong.  ;)
Title: Re: "If You Want To Learn Linux Install, Slackware."
Post by: perknh on August 03, 2014, 01:03:58 am
Hello AndyInMokum.

Now if you were trying to learn more about Linux, which of the the two distributions would you study first -- Crunchbang or Manjaro*? 

*In good conscience I have to mention a lesser known but excellent distribution called Bridge Linux, which is based on Arch, and operates on the theory that it is a bridge to learning Arch.  Bridge also has the benefit of not having to struggle with internal political problems like Manjaro is dealing with these days.  And at Bridge Linux they have Ninja-1, who I believe is either the, or a, lead developer for Bridge Linux.  And there's another fellow called sqlpython who is very knowledgeable and helpful too.  Bridge Linux has a very friendly forum, and you are encouraged to use the Arch Wiki with Bridge Linux.

Now, if you wanted to learn more about Linux, would you go in the direction of Debian (Crunchbang), or in the direction of Arch (Manjaro or Bridge)?

Good question, isn't it?  But, the best part about this question is that you can't give a wrong answer!  ;)

AndyInMokum, I'm doing this for my brain -- for some learning, and for some fun.

P.S.

I notice that when the Linux Foundation has a class, it suggests using a distribution from either Fedora, SUSE, or Debian/Ubuntu.  When I consider this, I think my best bet for learning more about Linux, since Peppermint is my home distro with a Debian/Ubuntu base, is to just keep plugging away at Crunchbang.

P.P.S.

I joined Crunchbang forum, and introduced myself, telling how I had put Crunchbang on my hard drive by mistake.  I also discovered I wasn't the only one who wanted an updated IceWeasel.  I'm keeping Wheezy, but I've already updated IceWeasel to version 31.  I don't really care what versions the other programs are.  I just wanted my browser up to date.

So thanks for the insights.

Title: Re: "If You Want To Learn Linux Install, Slackware."
Post by: perknh on March 06, 2015, 07:30:27 pm
Since Crunchbang is now gone, and since many of us are still continuing to learn something about Linux in one way or another.  I consider this article an interesting read.  This article echos a lot of what PCNetSpec has told us in the past.

This piece was written by Danny Stieben for makeuseof.

Code: [Select]
http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/want-to-learn-linux-these-four-distros-will-take-you-from-beginner-to-pro/
or

http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/want-to-learn-linux-these-four-distros-will-take-you-from-beginner-to-pro/ (http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/want-to-learn-linux-these-four-distros-will-take-you-from-beginner-to-pro/)
Title: Re: "If You Want To Learn Linux Install, Slackware."
Post by: AndyInMokum on March 06, 2015, 08:17:16 pm
Hi perknh, wow that list is a fast track into Linux hell IMHO.  An important distro was left out of list and I think it provides a much more constructive learning path.  That's good old Debian.  it's rock solid and super configurable.  It has a colossal community and it provides a far less intimidating learning path.  Arch, Gentoo and LFS are very much specialist distributions and are very good.  However, if you want to put a nOOb or, even someone with intermediate skills off Linux for life; these are the distros to do the job.

Peppermint itself is a great learning disto.  It comes as a relatively blank canvas compared to other Ubuntu based distros.  Everyone here who runs Peppermint has put their own spin on it.  That takes the ability to ask questions, learn the answers and then apply them.  No one really needs to look further than what we already have.  I'm not saying that it isn't good to look around and experiment with other distros.  I like to do that myself.  What I am saying is, there is no need to follow as gospel, the examples given in the link to learn about Linux  ;).
Title: Re: "If You Want To Learn Linux Install, Slackware."
Post by: perknh on March 06, 2015, 11:01:37 pm
Peppermint itself is a great learning disto.  It comes as a relatively blank canvas compared to other Ubuntu based distros.  Everyone here who runs Peppermint has put their own spin on it.  That takes the ability to ask questions, learn the answers and then apply them.  No one really needs to look further than what we already have.  I'm not saying that it isn't good to look around and experiment with other distros.  I like to do that myself.  What I am saying is, there is no need to follow as gospel, the examples given in the link to learn about Linux  ;).

I agree with every word AndyInMokum has said here.  So why did I post this?  It's because I keep hearing there are jobs to be had for those people who have skills with Linux.  So I start thinking again, "Why not learn the foundational distros?"

Personally, after listening to PCNetSpec's thoughts on security within Linux from reading AuroraMagic's thread, I'm convinced Ubuntu, and its derivatives such as Peppermint, are the safest distros to be found anywhere within Linux.  Personally, I need Skype, and I don't know where else to get it safely within Linux except through Ubuntu's Canonical Partners.  I don't know enough about compiling to pull Skype into any Linux distribution at will.  After discovering Canonical's Partners, I find that I need them!

As for Debian, one of classiest and finest distros I've ever seen is Sparky Linux.  The people managing and assisting noobs at Sparky are exemplary.  The people at Sparky Linux are genteel, kind, helpful, extraordinarily patient ... ad infinitum.  They are another group of decent human beings found within the Linux Community that aspire to the highest of Linux' ideals -- as do the members of Peppermint, I might add. (Open source, sharing, freedom, etc.) I don't have a bad word to say about anything Debian, and a comment or two below the article I posted agrees with AndyInMokum completely too.   Debian, Ubuntu, and their derivatives, make up more than 50% of all Linux distributions.  I find that fact, in and of itself, to be amazing.  In a way, we, using Peppermint, are using an alpha-plus Debian distribution ourselves.  We're on the cutting edge of Ubuntu, which is on the cutting edge of Debian -- with a few propitiatory tools thrown in.  And thank goodness for this, since this is still the world we live in.  Flawed as it is, I have to say thank you to Ubuntu for recognizing the importance of including a few proprietary add-ons or packages.

So here's what I'm hearing about Linux:  These are the things we supposedly need to know for meaningful employment concerning it's use*:

1) Software defined networking (SDN) skills.

2) Experience with or knowledge OpenStack and CloudStack.

3) Container knowledge concerning technologies concerning Docker.

4) Security with bugs such as Heatblead and FREAK.

5) Certification or formal training of SysAdmin (System Administrators) candidates.

*Source written by  Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols for ZDNet:
Code: [Select]
 http://www.zdnet.com/article/companies-really-want-linux-savvy-employees-and-they-want-them-now/
or

* http://www.zdnet.com/article/companies-really-want-linux-savvy-employees-and-they-want-them-now/
 (http://www.zdnet.com/article/companies-really-want-linux-savvy-employees-and-they-want-them-now/)

I don't have a clue what these things are, and I've been using Linux for a few years now.  But I thought this article, which would surely usher the average Linux user into a "Linux hell,"** may bring a lover of Linux closer to understanding the five concepts I just summarized above. 

** AndyInMokum's phraseology here is, again, something I happen to agree with completely.  I, personally, don't really need to go deeper than Peppermint, or Ubuntu, to get out of a disto what I want or need.  But, for employment matters, maybe going deeper within the more difficult or esoteric distos may be a means to decent job using Linux.  I don't know.    Still that's the motivation I have for sharing this article with my friends here at Peppermint.
Title: Re: "If You Want To Learn Linux Install, Slackware."
Post by: AndyInMokum on March 07, 2015, 04:04:24 am
Hi perknh, you are absolutely right.  When it come to being a professional Linux Systems Administrator or a Security Analyst.  You will need these skills.  If you are someone who is working with enterprise grade Linux.  The software you are mainly going to be working with will be, (Open)SUSE, Redhat, CentOS, Debian and a variety of wild and wonderful security distros.  These will be more than likely the tools that these "professionals" have learnt their "trade" on.  Not the likes of Gentoo or LFS.  These are for amateur nut jobs IMHO ;D.  Arch I can understand being used.  If for nothing else, it will be for their superb Wiki.  For us mere mortals  :D, what we have is ideal for our everyday needs.  Saying that, one of "my things to do this year"is to learn about using Ubuntu Server and the Debian based OpenMediaVault.  What it all boils down to is this.  What do you want to get out of Linux?  The answer to this question is as diverse as the multitude of Linux distributions ;)!!
Title: Re: "If You Want To Learn Linux Install, Slackware."
Post by: perknh on March 07, 2015, 01:31:02 pm
Hi AndyInMokum,

What could you use an Ubuntu Server for? (I'm surprised to hear in the news that Hillary Clinton has her own personal email server.)

You're thinking that an enterprise would be most apt to use Debian, Fedora, OpenSUSE and CentOS.  Here, in the states, we have an Internet Service Provider that uses Ubuntu as its main server.  And I know a fellow who works for this ISP working only within Ubuntu's command line.  For his job there is no GUI.

Also, this ISP never upgrades until it is absolutely necessary to do so.  The Ubuntu version he is using is still 12.04, or Precise Pangolin.  Which version of 12.04, I do not know.

perknh

P.S.

This ISP sure must think Ubuntu is both stable and secure.  This opinion is shared by the UK's security branch* and by perknh too!  ;)

* Source: http://www.zdnet.com/article/uks-security-branch-says-ubuntu-most-secure-end-user-os/#! (http://www.zdnet.com/article/uks-security-branch-says-ubuntu-most-secure-end-user-os/#!)
Title: Re: "If You Want To Learn Linux Install, Slackware."
Post by: AndyInMokum on March 07, 2015, 05:33:32 pm
Hi perknh, I brought up my interest in Ubuntu Server because I have been tinkering with setting up a home network.  I was having a conversation with PCNetSpec in regards to using an old Pentium 4 computer as a NAS.  He said it I would be surprised how well it would work if I used Ubuntu Server 14.04 LTS headless from the command line. PCNetSpec also reminded me that a Dual Core processor would be better if I want to use transcoding.  Emegra gave me some advice about using OpenMediaVault.  He's been using this for a long time and is very happy with it.  This alone warrants further investigation.  All this advice and info has "whet my geekbuds" so to speak  ;D. http://forum.peppermintos.com/index.php/topic,1379.msg12181.html#msg12181 (http://forum.peppermintos.com/index.php/topic,1379.msg12181.html#msg12181)

I'm still looking for the right machine at the right price.  The one I saw just before Christmas was gone by Jan 2.   I'm certainly looking forward setting up a home server when I do find the right machine.  You're absolutely correct.  It is a major oversight not to include Ubuntu Server in the list enterprise grade distros.  I know Debian is consider to be one of the most reliable server distros available.  Debian's strict adherence to the Open source ideology means it is community driven rather than share holder driven.  This makes it morally very attractive and also cost effective.  It also means businesses will probably need Linux service techs on their payroll.  Other enterprise grade server distros such as SUSE, Redhat, Ubuntu Server etc, offer professional service support packages.  This makes them very convenient in many business situations.  All this makes my needs seem very meagre.  I will find the right machine get it set up in a suitable RAID configuration and learn enough about server administration to keep me occupied and out of trouble.  There is just so much really interesting stuff to learn and do with Linux  :)!

Title: Re: "If You Want To Learn Linux Install, Slackware."
Post by: perknh on March 07, 2015, 07:33:53 pm
There is just so much really interesting stuff to learn and do with Linux  :)!

AndyInMokum, I'm so impressed that I don't know where to begin.  You're really leaning Linux -- from DEs, servers, encryption, secure shells, and command line interfaces.  AndyInMokum, you're leaning the whole kit and caboodle of Linux.  If it hasn't already done so, I wouldn't be surprised if one day you convince the city of Amsterdam to go completely open source -- beginning, of course, with Linux. (I can't tell from what I've read if Amsterdam has gone open source or not, but open source would seem to fit in with the philosophy of the country.)

AndyInMokum, if I were a citizen of the Netherlands, and a resident of Amsterdam, I'd vote for you for mayor!  ;)
Title: Re: "If You Want To Learn Linux Install, Slackware."
Post by: AndyInMokum on March 07, 2015, 08:06:25 pm
Hi perknh, you are again absolutely correct.  Linux is an ideal fit for The Netherlands from a philosophical standpoint.  Getting them to implement it is another story though.   Strangely enough, it is our noisy neighbours to the east of us that have embraced Linux on a municipal level.  More power to them too, "Deutschland über alles"  ;)!!   I don't know about mayor - yet  ;D.  Saying that, we do have local elections in a few days  :D!!
Title: Re: "If You Want To Learn Linux Install, Slackware."
Post by: PCNetSpec on March 07, 2015, 09:42:54 pm
+1 for Mayor Andy :)
Title: Re: "If You Want To Learn Linux Install, Slackware."
Post by: perknh on March 07, 2015, 11:02:13 pm
We need AndyInMokum T-shirts.  We need AndyInMokum coffee mugs.  We need to make this guy mayor!  :)
Title: Re: "If You Want To Learn Linux Install, Slackware."
Post by: PCNetSpec on March 08, 2015, 02:38:59 pm
(http://i.imgur.com/A9vmsJh.jpg)
Title: Re: "If You Want To Learn Linux Install, Slackware."
Post by: rjm65 on March 08, 2015, 03:10:51 pm
Where do we cast our vote at?    :-\
Title: Re: "If You Want To Learn Linux Install, Slackware."
Post by: PCNetSpec on March 08, 2015, 03:51:30 pm
(http://i.imgur.com/M1hBjYZ.jpg)
Title: Re: "If You Want To Learn Linux Install, Slackware."
Post by: AndyInMokum on March 08, 2015, 05:13:35 pm
(http://i.imgur.com/A9vmsJh.jpg)

A Vote For Me - Is A Vote For Peppermint Linux On Every Computer

Peppermint Five - Simply Logical

Title: Re: "If You Want To Learn Linux Install, Slackware."
Post by: PCNetSpec on March 08, 2015, 05:58:35 pm
(http://i.imgur.com/EyRkfRn.jpg)
Title: Re: "If You Want To Learn Linux Install, Slackware."
Post by: rjm65 on March 09, 2015, 08:44:58 am
what is the latest vote tally who is winning the race so far?
Title: Re: "If You Want To Learn Linux Install, Slackware."
Post by: PCNetSpec on March 09, 2015, 09:20:05 am
See for yourself .. click the link  below
Mokum Mayoral Elections 2015 (http://forum.peppermintos.com/index.php/topic,1595.0.html)
:)