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General => GNU/Linux Discussion => Topic started by: AndyInMokum on July 11, 2016, 07:16:34 pm

Title: Bulgaria goes Open source.
Post by: AndyInMokum on July 11, 2016, 07:16:34 pm
Finally a country that's bold enough to do the right thing.  It takes a former Communist state to be an advocat of computing freedom - well done Bulgaria: Bulgaria Makes Open Source Compulsory For All Government Software (https://itsfoss.com/bulgaria-open-source/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=hats_off_to_bulgarias_new_open_source_policy_and_other_linux_stories)  ;)!!
Title: Re: Bulgaria goes Open source.
Post by: Bloch on July 12, 2016, 06:43:38 pm
Good!  8)
Quote
Embracing the spirit of open source, the Italian city Vincenza has decided to install Linux distribution Zorin OS, switching from Microsoft Windows operating system.
Look at: http://fossbytes.com/italy-vicenza-adopts-zorin-os-linux-replace-windows/
Title: Re: Bulgaria goes Open source.
Post by: scifidude79 on July 12, 2016, 11:12:28 pm
I guess they couldn't afford those license fees anymore. ;)
Title: Re: Bulgaria goes Open source.
Post by: AndyInMokum on July 13, 2016, 01:00:59 am
I guess they couldn't afford those license fees anymore. ;)
The penny dropped with someone, somewhere  ;).
Title: Re: Bulgaria goes Open source.
Post by: scifidude79 on July 13, 2016, 09:43:49 am
With M$, it was a bit more than a penny.  :o

Sheer irony:  You're talking about pennies and, at the bottom of my page was an ad about storage for a penny a month. ;)
Title: Re: Bulgaria goes Open source.
Post by: Kyle on July 13, 2016, 10:46:28 pm
It's amazing that this is finally happening. I can imagine this dramatically increasing the interest/usage of Linux and open-source software in Bulgaria and other nearby European countries. Hopefully, other countries will soon follow and maybe we can see a significant interest in open-source software and operating systems.
Title: Re: Bulgaria goes Open source.
Post by: perknh on July 20, 2016, 07:55:52 am
Quote
.. whatever custom software the government procures will be visible and accessible to everyone. After all, it’s paid by tax-payers money and they should both be able to see it and benefit from it.  --Bozhidar Bozhanov

Where did you say this guy was born?  I ask because there's a job opening up here in the States for a guy like this this coming January.  I'd love to see a Bozhanov type come out of the blue and toss his or her hat into the ring before we're forced to start stocking up on peanut butter and marshmallow fluff for the next four years.  ;)
Title: Re: Bulgaria goes Open source.
Post by: Skara Brae on October 15, 2016, 08:27:55 pm
A little <bump>, if I may :)

I don't want to ruin the party, but... Back in 2004, the "department" of the (federal) government of my country switched to SLED Linux 10 w/ KDE 3.5, after years of Windows 2000 (at the end, my PC needed more than 3 minutes to take me to the W2K desktop.) Before W2K, we ran a UNIX network (IBM's AIX 4.3). It was rock-solid.

SLED 10 worked fine for nearly 8 years (it never got updated, though...). All my colleagues had no problem working with it. We used OpenOffice 2.4 (which also was never upgraded/replaced).

Then Microsoft got word of the switch to Linux and decided to find it unacceptable that the government of my country no longer ran their software products (meaning: MS Windows and MS Office). So, two years ago now, we all got new ("refurbished") computers with Windows 7 on them.

When I ask people from IT (just for fun) whether Windows or Linux is better, they start chuckling.  We all know why...

Everyone in said department of my country now runs Windows 7 Enterprise, and Microsoft Windows is still the same crap that it has always been. Two years into Window 7, and the "degradation" has already begun. My two home computers with Windows Vista run faster than Windows 7 (Surely this cannot be because of extra network settings at work...)

I once asked the "IT Helpdesk" why Windows was chosen, and the reply was that Microsoft was asked what was the best way to uniformize the 'computer park'. I still wonder if they were sh!tting me. (They probably meant it.)

Just for fun, I also once asked IT if we couldn't get Macs. I got a reply, saying Macs are too expensive :P (As if I don't know that.)

Microsoft Windows is the MOST unreliable thing that I have ever worked with in my entire life.

So, the Bulgarians better enjoy their Opensource programs. It won't last. :'(
Title: Re: Bulgaria goes Open source.
Post by: scifidude79 on October 15, 2016, 11:11:42 pm
It would be hilarious (and cool) if the IT guys had simply wiped the drives of those refurbished computers, installed Linux and then sent Microsoft a nice thank you note for the hardware.  ;)
Title: Re: Bulgaria goes Open source.
Post by: PCNetSpec on October 16, 2016, 12:06:54 pm
A LOT has changed in the IT Dept/Management consciousness since 2004 (even since 2012) .. this in no longer an extraordinary occurance ;)
(in fact Win10 is busy making it the norm)
Title: Re: Bulgaria goes Open source.
Post by: perknh on November 26, 2016, 07:23:11 pm
Finally a country that's bold enough to do the right thing.  It takes a former Communist state to be an advocat of computing freedom - well done Bulgaria: Bulgaria Makes Open Source Compulsory For All Government Software (https://itsfoss.com/bulgaria-open-source/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=hats_off_to_bulgarias_new_open_source_policy_and_other_linux_stories)  ;)!!

While Bulgaria had the sense to go Open Source, Brazil has decided to ditch open-source software and go back to Microsoft.  Apparently Microsoft cut a deal with Brazil.

Quote
...Brazil is opting for Microsoft for ‘cost efficiency’. It’s actually a deal with Microsoft that will allow the Brazilian government to buy Microsoft product licenses as per their requirement in the next 12 months, at a previously negotiated price.

Source:

BRAZIL IS DITCHING OPEN SOURCE FOR MICROSOFT

By Abhishek Prakash (https://itsfoss.com/author/abhishek/) for It's F.O.S.S. (https://itsfoss.com)

https://itsfoss.com/brazil-open-source-microsoft/# (https://itsfoss.com/brazil-open-source-microsoft/#)
Title: Re: Bulgaria goes Open source.
Post by: AndyInMokum on November 26, 2016, 07:52:09 pm
Sounds like there's some monkey business going on there  :-X!!
Title: Re: Bulgaria goes Open source.
Post by: perknh on November 26, 2016, 08:13:41 pm
Sounds like there's some monkey business going on there  :-X!!

Sure does.  Remember a few years ago when Ubuntu's 12.04 Precise Pangolin had a record of zero known breeches.  The talk in the UK at the time was that the British government was going to go Open Source and was going to make Ubuntu its distribution of choice.  Somehow, mysteriously, that idea got nixed, and the story went away.  :-X
Title: Re: Bulgaria goes Open source.
Post by: scifidude79 on November 26, 2016, 11:10:34 pm
It sounds like the NSA wants to spy on Brazil, so they had Microsoft "make them an offer they can't refuse."

My favorite part was where they wanted people to develop software for them but a "lack of skill and interest" made that idea go away.  OK.  What about the software that exists already?  What did they really need that they can't get from the FOSS community?  Plus, their commitment to OpenOffice is definitely questionable.  Why not switch to LibreOffice when it became evident that OpenOffice was dead?  I mean, that was the point of the LibreOffice project to begin with; making sure a great FOSS office solution would continue to be available.  It sounds to me like nobody in the government really knows what they are doing when it comes to FOSS.  It's probably best they go back to Microsoft, who will hold their hand and guide them through the whole thing.  ::)
Title: Re: Bulgaria goes Open source.
Post by: perknh on November 26, 2016, 11:59:03 pm
It sounds like the NSA wants to spy on Brazil, so they had Microsoft "make them an offer they can't refuse."

Hi scifidude79,

That was an interesting thought, and then I found this from the REUTERS (http://venturebeat.com/author/reuters/) section of VentureBeat (http://venturebeat.com/about/):

Microsoft allows Brazil to inspect its source code for ‘back doors’

http://venturebeat.com/2016/10/19/microsoft-allows-brazil-to-inspect-its-source-code-for-back-doors/ (http://venturebeat.com/2016/10/19/microsoft-allows-brazil-to-inspect-its-source-code-for-back-doors/)
Title: Re: Bulgaria goes Open source.
Post by: scifidude79 on November 27, 2016, 12:50:29 am
It sounds like the NSA wants to spy on Brazil, so they had Microsoft "make them an offer they can't refuse."

Hi scifidude79,

That was an interesting thought, and then I found this from the REUTERS (http://venturebeat.com/author/reuters/) section of VentureBeat (http://venturebeat.com/about/):

Microsoft allows Brazil to inspect its source code for ‘back doors’

http://venturebeat.com/2016/10/19/microsoft-allows-brazil-to-inspect-its-source-code-for-back-doors/ (http://venturebeat.com/2016/10/19/microsoft-allows-brazil-to-inspect-its-source-code-for-back-doors/)

Whew!  That would certainly allay my fears.  After all, it's not like the OS "reports home" massive amounts of data that contains who knows what, that MS could then just send to the NSA.  Oh, wait....
Title: Re: Bulgaria goes Open source.
Post by: perknh on November 27, 2016, 01:38:29 am
Whew!  That would certainly allay my fears.  After all, it's not like the OS "reports home" massive amounts of data that contains who knows what, that MS could then just send to the NSA.  Oh, wait....

I've heard there's no need for "backdoors" any longer.  What these giant tech companies do now is continue to keep "bugs" alive and well --bugs that never seem to get patched.  Therefore these so-called 'bugs' become de facto backdoors for whatever their calling.  Me, personally, I think a bug-free Windows 10 OS is an oxymoronic phrase.  It will never exist.

Yeah, in the long run the Brazilian people will get screwed by this deal, and a small handful of people, I'm sure, will make a lot of money off of it too.
Title: Re: Bulgaria goes Open source.
Post by: scifidude79 on November 27, 2016, 09:40:49 am
I don't know, I know nothing about hacking or exploits.  I just know going back to Microsoft isn't the answer.  And, you can't say it's a financial decision.  "Hey, we were paying nothing for licenses before, let's go back to MS, where we pay less than usual for licenses, but we still pay something."  No, something shady probably happened behind closed doors to make this happen.  And, yes, somebody is definitely making money.  Microsoft, for one.  After all, it's not like they have to charge as much as they do for licenses.  Someone figured out a price to where they still profit but it's more affordable for Brazil than what they normally charge.
Title: Re: Bulgaria goes Open source.
Post by: perknh on November 27, 2016, 10:30:17 am
It sounds like the NSA wants to spy on Brazil, so they had Microsoft "make them an offer they can't refuse."

Well, I can see that Microsoft certainly doesn't want to lose Brazil to open source software.  Brazil is a huge market.

,,,their commitment to OpenOffice is definitely questionable.  Why not switch to LibreOffice when it became evident that OpenOffice was dead?

That was an odd decision on the Brazilian government's part.  :-\

I don't know, I know nothing about hacking or exploits. 

I don't know that much about hacking and exploits either.  Bugs are supposed to be unintentional.  My interpretation of this is that when something is called a bug, but is then put within the software code intentionally in order to do some kind of harm or spying, this is either some kind of malware or a hidden backdoor.    Here's (https://blogs.cisco.com/security/features-bugs-and-backdoors-the-differences-how-language-can-be-misused-and-a-word-of-caution) something simple to read from Cisco describing the difference between bugs and backdoors for a layperson such as myself.  And here's (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Backdoor_(computing)) something from Wikipedia concerning backdoors that goes into more depth on the subject.  Sometimes, and I don't know how often, backdoors are placed into code for legitimate purposes.  Not always, of course, but sometimes.  ;)