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Author Topic: new home-built linux desktop  (Read 2834 times)

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Offline cfx795

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new home-built linux desktop
« on: October 02, 2017, 06:50:18 pm »
I'm building a new desktop computer, and I intend to load Peppermint 8 as the operating system. The thing might (I say *might*) look something like this:

CPU: Intel - Pentium G4600 3.6GHz Dual-Core Processor
Motherboard: Gigabyte - GA-B250M-DS3H Micro ATX LGA1151 Motherboard
Memory: Corsair - Vengeance LPX 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR4-2666 Memory
Storage: Seagate - FireCuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Hybrid Internal Hard Drive
Video Card: Gigabyte - GeForce GT 1030 2GB Low Profile Video Card
Case: Corsair - 200R ATX Mid Tower Case
Monitor: Acer - G227HQLbi 21.5" 1920x1080 60Hz Monitor
Keyboard: Redragon - K552 Wired Gaming Keyboard
... and Peppermint 8.

I've already got the case and psu, keyboard, mouse and speakers. Maybe I'll buy a monitor, next. I'm sort of taking the attitude of wait-and-see (hide-and-watch, my mom&dad say) with regard to the present state of micro-architecture. Ryzen is all the rage at the moment, but I'm not a gamer, and it doesn't make $$ense to me that the Ryzen cpu's don't have integrated graphics. Hence, I lean towards Intel. Then again, Intel comes out with Coffee Lake later this week, even, and the whole scene is pretty confusing if you're trying to make decisions... it moves SO fast. 

I'm not a gamer, try to explain that in most forums, or that you prefer Linux, you'll probably get stoned or something. But I'm waiting for some of the smoke to clear with regard to the new Intel architecture.

I might like to see what games are available. I may or may not get into it. I just bought the gaming keyboard because someone over on Tom's Hardware suggested it, and it looked cool, that's all.

Anyway, I'm really open to suggestions about motherboards, cpus, RAM, storage and (maybe) discrete GPU (if I decide I need one, later..) I'd be particularly keen to have any ideas or advice about Linux compatibility or friendliness with regard to manufacturers or specific units. Another thing is that I'm wondering about the world of Linux games. I really don't want to go back to Windows. Some of the other forums are pretty dismissive of either Linux or Mac for gaming (maybe it's justified, I don't know) and if you suggest you might like to make do with a sub-200 dollar graphics card, you're sort of met with perplexed looks or the proverbial blank stare...
« Last Edit: October 02, 2017, 07:19:51 pm by cfx795 »

Offline cfx795

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Re: new home-built linux desktop
« Reply #1 on: October 02, 2017, 06:56:45 pm »
Oh yeah. The hybrid firecuda drive was just an idea. I've heard some people say they aren't worth it, get an SSD. I'm inclined to consider HDD's as a thing of the past, and get either a regular SSD or these SSD's that are REALLY fast that fit into your M.2 connector on your motherboard. The NVMe interface.

Offline Slim.Fatz

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Re: new home-built linux desktop
« Reply #2 on: October 03, 2017, 03:59:32 am »
Hi cfx795,

Looks like you are having fun putting your new machine together. Definitely go with an SSD and forget the HDDs -- their days are over. At least one or two regular posters here have newer SSDs with the NVMe interface and I'm sure on of them will jump in here and give you their experience report.  8)

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Offline zebedeeboss

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Re: new home-built linux desktop
« Reply #3 on: October 03, 2017, 04:14:15 am »
Hi cfx795,

Welcome to the Forums :)

That looks like it will be a very nice build.

I have a machine with both a normal SSD (Samsung Evo 850) and an NVMe SSD (SAMSUNG PM951 M.2,).  In general day to day use I honestly can't see or feel the difference between the two.   Any speed test I do, reflects the fact that the NVMe drive IS quicker, but I can't tell.

Would I buy another... probably because specs say it's faster and any extra speed you get is always a good thing.  If it means breaking the budget... then I would not lose any sleep over getting a normal SSD.

Hope this helps.

Regards Zeb...

My system build >> https://forum.peppermintos.com/index.php/topic,3455.msg52933.html#msg52933
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Offline cfx795

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Re: new home-built linux desktop
« Reply #4 on: October 03, 2017, 10:16:43 pm »
Hi cfx795,

Welcome to the Forums :)

That looks like it will be a very nice build.

I have a machine with both a normal SSD (Samsung Evo 850) and an NVMe SSD (SAMSUNG PM951 M.2,).  In general day to day use I honestly can't see or feel the difference between the two.   Any speed test I do, reflects the fact that the NVMe drive IS quicker, but I can't tell.

Would I buy another... probably because specs say it's faster and any extra speed you get is always a good thing.  If it means breaking the budget... then I would not lose any sleep over getting a normal SSD.

Hope this helps.

Regards Zeb...

My system build >> https://forum.peppermintos.com/index.php/topic,3455.msg52933.html#msg52933
Thanks for the input about the SATA vs. NVMe SSD's. That gives me some needed perspective, and opens up a larger array of options, if I include both interfaces in my search for a drive. I don't think the NVMe would necessarily break the bank. I think I could get a 250GB M.2 drive for... meh. $100 or just over $100. But I was looking at the SATA SSD's and it looked like I might be about to get a 480GB drive for maybe $150. Still sort of pricey, but a lot less than they were a few years back. That was just sort of a cursory glance, I haven't really launched this search, just yet. Maybe later this fall. I still need to even get a monitor, and perhaps a nice mic, maybe one of these snowball units. I revised my build with a SSD instead of the hybrid drive, and a couple tweaks. I doubt the mobo/cpu/ram will stay the same, if the new Intel chips are coming out later this week. Then again, they tend to release the higher end chips - i7, i5 and i3, first, and often it's another few months before they release the Pentiums and Celerons, if that's what they continue to do. I will hide and watch.


CPU: Intel - Pentium G4600 3.6GHz Dual-Core Processor
Motherboard: Gigabyte - GA-B250M-DS3H Micro ATX LGA1151 Motherboard
Memory: Crucial - Ballistix Sport LT 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR4-2400 Memory
Storage: Western Digital - Black PCIe 256GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive
Case: Corsair - 200R ATX Mid Tower Case
Power Supply: SeaSonic - 520W 80+ Bronze Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply
Monitor: Acer - G277HL bid 27.0" 1920x1080 60Hz Monitor
Keyboard: Redragon - K552 Wired Gaming Keyboard 
Mouse: Logitech - M325 Wireless Optical Mouse
Other: Blue Microphones Snowball Black iCE Condenser Microphone
Other: AmazonBasics USB Powered Computer Speakers (A100)
« Last Edit: October 04, 2017, 12:15:29 am by cfx795 »

Offline PCNetSpec

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Re: new home-built linux desktop
« Reply #5 on: October 04, 2017, 11:19:39 am »
I'd get a say 240GB SSD (on a desktop doesn't really matter if its M.2 or SATA, and IMHO for most use cases NVMe currently carry an unnecessary price premium) for the main drive and add an HDD for long term storage (at a later date if necessary).

IMHO SSHDD's are a waste of time, having the benefit of neither, and forcing you to choose less performance at time of purchase .. get the largest SSD you can afford, and add an HDD later.

Remember though, SSD's perform better (and last longer) the more free space there is on them, so get the largest you can afford, then add an HDD for general storage.
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Re: new home-built linux desktop
« Reply #6 on: October 04, 2017, 12:07:38 pm »
Remember though, SSD's perform better (and last longer) the more free space there is on them[...]

All good advice, especially leaving some slack on the SSD.

Personally, I leave 10% unpartitioned, give-or-take, to let it do its magic.

Example: I'm on the lappy right now. Flies like the wind - Peppermint and '10'...



Offline PCNetSpec

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Re: new home-built linux desktop
« Reply #7 on: October 04, 2017, 01:14:56 pm »
What I mean is, AS WELL AS leaving unpartitioned space for overprovisioning, you should also try not to overfill any partition.

Overprovisioning takes care of leaving room for blocks flagged as damaged to be moved elsewhere, but overfilling a partition kinda thwarts the efforts of wear levelling (and other firmware optimisations).

So the more free space the better...

See this:

from about 4:10

A 240GB SSD has plenty of room for a couple of distros and all the apps you're likely to install (excepting possibly games or large databases), but if you have a load of say music/pics/videos/etc. as "user" files, they'd be better on an HDD.
« Last Edit: October 04, 2017, 01:38:37 pm by PCNetSpec »
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Offline scifidude79

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Re: new home-built linux desktop
« Reply #8 on: October 04, 2017, 01:21:58 pm »
Basically, he means install the system on there, keep all your personal stuff on a HDD.  ;)

Offline PCNetSpec

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Re: new home-built linux desktop
« Reply #9 on: October 04, 2017, 01:42:07 pm »
scifidude has a (good) habit of simplifying the oft-drivel I sometimes come out with :))
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Re: new home-built linux desktop
« Reply #10 on: October 04, 2017, 01:53:20 pm »
All good advice, especially leaving some slack on the SSD.

Oh, okay...  8)

Offline scifidude79

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Re: new home-built linux desktop
« Reply #11 on: October 04, 2017, 02:44:33 pm »
scifidude has a (good) habit of simplifying the oft-drivel I sometimes come out with :))

Yeah, I was picking up what you were throwing down.  It helps that I've been thinking of getting a SSD for myself and switching my main drive over to my personal files/backup drive.  ;)

Offline grafiksinc

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Re: new home-built linux desktop
« Reply #12 on: October 04, 2017, 09:25:23 pm »
While we are on this SSD subject.
I don t have any experience as of yet with SSDs other than my ASUS  laptop, but based off of the video and from what I think you guys are saying... the more your write/use a SSD the sooner it will reach end of life,  is that correct?

If that is the case then VPS hosts like digitalocean.com, linode etc... and others  must be blowing through drives, depending on how much their drives are used.

or am I misunderstanding something  :-\


Offline cfx795

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Re: new home-built linux desktop
« Reply #13 on: October 04, 2017, 10:28:16 pm »
I guess I'll have to give some thought about drive. Most of my stuff personal stuff is stored on settings and bookmarks on the Chrome or Chromium browser, and the cloud drive. I've had small-ish SSD's in the past, although I think the machine I consigned over to my Dad last Christmas has a 120GB SSD. Before that,  in years past, I think I'd only had 16GB and 32GB SSD's because they were pretty expensive at that time.

The only way I really foresee consuming much space on either the SSD or HDD is if I do decide to load Windows, and get into the world of gaming, and Windows games, which I have heard sometimes take 25 or 30GB of disk space. But, I sort of doubt that will happen. I'd rather avoid either buying or loading any Windows OS, I was happy with just (Peppermint) Linux in recent years. I'll compare some of the drives, their prices, etc. Probably the 240GB SSD that PCNetSpec mentioned would be a good option for me. Or less, really. I mean, really all I want is a boot drive for a Linux (P8) OS. I don't need 240GB for that, do I? I see 60GB SSD's for $35 and 120 or 128GB SSD's for... $50. I fully intend to just load P8 and nothing else.

I mean, this was sort of the reason I tried to get away from the whole wide-world of Windows, I realized I'm neither packrat or power-user, and I prefer a minimalist approach and fewer, smaller drives and devices and. You know.

(Maybe I'm just a dirty commie.) Oh yeah, so like reading some of the reviews for the NVMe devices, I get the sense that some people suspect that they are sort of... fragile? Is that the word? They're certainly very fast, but as zebedeeboss sort of alluded to, there's the sort of speeds that the human brain tends to notice, and then there's like. Technical specs and benchmark speeds that look great on paper, but... yeah.

Offline cfx795

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Re: new home-built linux desktop
« Reply #14 on: October 04, 2017, 11:01:46 pm »
What I mean is, AS WELL AS leaving unpartitioned space for overprovisioning, you should also try not to overfill any partition.

Overprovisioning takes care of leaving room for blocks flagged as damaged to be moved elsewhere, but overfilling a partition kinda thwarts the efforts of wear levelling (and other firmware optimisations).

So the more free space the better...

See this:

from about 4:10

A 240GB SSD has plenty of room for a couple of distros and all the apps you're likely to install (excepting possibly games or large databases), but if you have a load of say music/pics/videos/etc. as "user" files, they'd be better on an HDD.

OK, I think I get it. A 120GB drive is probably going to last me a good deal longer than a 60GB drive, and a 240... well. Say no more. Don't the larger drives tend to be faster than the smaller drives, also? Seemed like that when I was last studying the specs...

So then you have all the SLC eMLC MLC TLC... ouch. Don't watch this dinner while you're trying to prepare dinner over a hot stove. This one needs your attention... hah. So it would seem that most of what is currently on the market is probably (probably) MLC NAND? Good thing I have time to absorb all this stuff and give it some thought and look at the specs on the various units out there...
« Last Edit: October 04, 2017, 11:16:39 pm by cfx795 »