Choose style:

Author Topic: Boot slow after battery was low  (Read 1357 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline VandiumRoadrunner

  • nOOb
  • *
  • Posts: 23
  • Karma: 0
  • New Forum User
    • View Profile
  • Peppermint version(s): 7
Boot slow after battery was low
« on: April 19, 2017, 11:33:39 pm »
So I was working with my laptop, and then with the battery around 8% I wrapped up my work, but did not turn off my machine. Half an hour later, no battery so I went to plug it in, and my boot was incredibly low. It took me 56s to get to the password log in. Usually the machine boots in 10-15s with the BIOS showing up for a second and then the /dev/sda1 black screen. Now the BIOS comes up the same, but for 20-30s a black screen is showing then followed by /dev/sda1 boot screen.

Could this be a log error or corruption? I ran
Code: [Select]
dmseg
as I read online that this could reviel log errors. I got the following in red error.
Code: [Select]
[    3.806828] sd 6:0:0:0: [sdb] No Caching mode page found
[    3.806835] sd 6:0:0:0: [sdb] Assuming drive cache: write through

This was then followed by

Code: [Select]
[   62.162016] talpa-vetting: [intercepted 1-1790-1790] Open failed (-13), will have no stream

My laptop specs running
Code: [Select]
inxi -F
are

Code: [Select]
System:    Host: vandium Kernel: 4.4.0-72-generic x86_64 (64 bit) Desktop: N/A
           Distro: Peppermint Seven
Machine:   System: TOSHIBA product: Satellite L755 v: PSK1WU-0TW048
           Mobo: Intel model: N/A Bios: INSYDE v: 3.10 date: 02/10/2012
CPU:       Dual core Intel Core i5-2450M (-HT-MCP-) cache: 3072 KB
           clock speeds: max: 3100 MHz 1: 904 MHz 2: 924 MHz 3: 857 MHz
           4: 1067 MHz
Graphics:  Card: Intel 2nd Generation Core Processor Family Integrated Graphics Controller
           Display Server: X.Org 1.18.4 drivers: intel (unloaded: fbdev,vesa)
           Resolution: 1366x768@60.00hz
           GLX Renderer: Mesa DRI Intel Sandybridge Mobile
           GLX Version: 3.0 Mesa 12.0.6
Audio:     Card Intel 6 Series/C200 Series Family High Definition Audio Controller
           driver: snd_hda_intel
           Sound: Advanced Linux Sound Architecture v: k4.4.0-72-generic
Network:   Card-1: Realtek RTL8188CE 802.11b/g/n WiFi Adapter
           driver: rtl8192ce
           IF: wlp2s0 state: up mac: 74:de:2b:f4:ee:8d
           Card-2: Qualcomm Atheros AR8152 v2.0 Fast Ethernet driver: atl1c
           IF: enp3s0 state: down mac: 04:7d:7b:2f:3e:d6
Drives:    HDD Total Size: 766.2GB (14.3% used)
           ID-1: /dev/sda model: TOSHIBA_MK7575GS size: 750.2GB
           ID-2: USB /dev/sdb model: Multi size: 16.0GB
Partition: ID-1: / size: 682G used: 97G (15%) fs: ext4 dev: /dev/sda1
           ID-2: swap-1 size: 6.39GB used: 0.00GB (0%) fs: swap dev: /dev/sda5
RAID:      No RAID devices: /proc/mdstat, md_mod kernel module present
Sensors:   System Temperatures: cpu: 56.0C mobo: N/A
           Fan Speeds (in rpm): cpu: N/A
Info:      Processes: 206 Uptime: 20 min Memory: 1989.9/5914.7MB
           Client: Shell (bash) inxi: 2.2.35

I would greatly appreciate anyone's help to undo whatever the battery shortage did. Thank you!

Offline PCNetSpec

  • Administrator
  • Hero
  • *****
  • Posts: 26290
  • Karma: 2855
  • "-rw-rw-rw-" .. The Number Of The Beast
    • View Profile
    • PCNetSpec
  • Peppermint version(s): Peppermint 10
Re: Boot slow after battery was low
« Reply #1 on: April 20, 2017, 12:23:34 pm »
talpa-vetting is something to do with sophos anti-virus on-access scanning .. have you installed this ?

Try running:
Code: [Select]
sudo touch /forcesfck
then reboot.

Once that reboot finishes, reboot again and check if booting is now speedier again.

If not, please post the output from:
Code: [Select]
systemd-analyze critical-chain
and
Code: [Select]
systemd-analyze blame
WARNING: You are logged into reality as 'root' .. logging in as 'insane' is the only safe option.

Team Peppermint
PCNetSpec

Offline VandiumRoadrunner

  • nOOb
  • *
  • Posts: 23
  • Karma: 0
  • New Forum User
    • View Profile
  • Peppermint version(s): 7
Re: Boot slow after battery was low
« Reply #2 on: April 20, 2017, 03:28:19 pm »
Thanks PCNetSpec for getting back to me.

Yes, I do have sophos anti-virus running, and I think that is the problem.

I ran:

Code: [Select]
[b]sudo[/b] touch /forcesfck

and booted twice, but no avail.

Here are the code outputs, respectively as you gave them to me.

Code: [Select]
The time after the unit is active or started is printed after the "@" character.
The time the unit takes to start is printed after the "+" character.

graphical.target @1min 10.573s
└─multi-user.target @1min 10.555s
  └─smbd.service @1min 5.541s +5.013s
    └─nmbd.service @55.423s +10.100s
      └─network-online.target @55.419s
        └─NetworkManager-wait-online.service @30.737s +24.676s
          └─NetworkManager.service @25.305s +5.420s
            └─dbus.service @17.393s
              └─basic.target @17.372s
                └─paths.target @17.372s
                  └─acpid.path @17.372s
                    └─sysinit.target @16.121s
                      └─apparmor.service @6.023s +9.767s
                        └─local-fs.target @5.931s
                          └─run-user-1000-gvfs.mount @47.836s
                            └─run-user-1000.mount @44.910s
                              └─local-fs-pre.target @5.905s
                                └─systemd-remount-fs.service @5.837s +44ms
                                  └─systemd-journald.socket @2.396s
                                    └─-.slice @2.390s
lines 1-23...skipping...
The time after the unit is active or started is printed after the "@" character.
The time the unit takes to start is printed after the "+" character.

graphical.target @1min 10.573s
└─multi-user.target @1min 10.555s
  └─smbd.service @1min 5.541s +5.013s
    └─nmbd.service @55.423s +10.100s
      └─network-online.target @55.419s
        └─NetworkManager-wait-online.service @30.737s +24.676s
          └─NetworkManager.service @25.305s +5.420s
            └─dbus.service @17.393s
              └─basic.target @17.372s
                └─paths.target @17.372s
                  └─acpid.path @17.372s
                    └─sysinit.target @16.121s
                      └─apparmor.service @6.023s +9.767s
                        └─local-fs.target @5.931s
                          └─run-user-1000-gvfs.mount @47.836s
                            └─run-user-1000.mount @44.910s
                              └─local-fs-pre.target @5.905s
                                └─systemd-remount-fs.service @5.837s +44ms
                                  └─systemd-journald.socket @2.396s
                                    └─-.slice @2.390s
~
~
~
~
~
~
~
~
~
~
~
~
~
~
~
~
~
~

and

Code: [Select]
 39.199s sav-protect.service
         24.676s NetworkManager-wait-online.service
         16.681s networking.service
         15.432s irqbalance.service
         10.232s accounts-daemon.service
         10.100s nmbd.service
          9.884s winbind.service
          9.767s apparmor.service
          9.200s console-kit-log-system-start.service
          9.020s mintsystem.service
          8.863s timidity.service
          8.790s dev-sda1.device
          8.439s samba-ad-dc.service
          8.369s grub-common.service
          7.975s gpu-manager.service
          7.934s iio-sensor-proxy.service
          7.933s systemd-user-sessions.service
          7.927s rsyslog.service
          7.897s avahi-daemon.service
          7.460s ondemand.service
          7.409s lightdm.service
          5.420s NetworkManager.service
          5.013s smbd.service
          2.505s console-setup.service
          2.471s ModemManager.service
          1.849s binfmt-support.service
          1.759s plymouth-start.service
          1.557s systemd-udevd.service
          1.539s systemd-tmpfiles-setup-dev.service
          1.260s udisks2.service
          1.105s systemd-journald.service
          1.048s upower.service
          1.036s polkitd.service
          1.019s systemd-modules-load.service
           853ms systemd-rfkill.service
           790ms geoclue.service
           747ms systemd-logind.service
           741ms systemd-backlight@backlight:acpi_video0.service
           732ms keyboard-setup.service
           555ms systemd-udev-trigger.service
           512ms systemd-tmpfiles-setup.service
lines 1-41

I think I see sophos eating up the most rescouces so I guess that the battery drain must have corrupted something. Is a complete uninstall and purge the best way to fix this error? I am not married to sophos, I just have it as a precaution because as a teacher I frequently get .doc and .zip files from the web. Let me know if this is the only solution or if there is another fix. Is there anything else you think that is slowing me down?

Thank you again so much.

Offline PCNetSpec

  • Administrator
  • Hero
  • *****
  • Posts: 26290
  • Karma: 2855
  • "-rw-rw-rw-" .. The Number Of The Beast
    • View Profile
    • PCNetSpec
  • Peppermint version(s): Peppermint 10
Re: Boot slow after battery was low
« Reply #3 on: April 20, 2017, 03:40:21 pm »
Yeah I'd purge sophos .. I'd then not bother reinstalling it, microsoft office macro viruses are highly unlikely to affect a Linux host OS and office suites such as LibreOffice have macros disabled by default anyway.

.zip files are another matter, it depends what they contain .. but simply put, if you don't "run" any binary executables they contain "as root" you're safe.

Basically if you're ever doing anything with one of the zip files and their contents and are prompted for your password, DO NOT enter it.

About the ONLY reason I can think of for AV in Linux is if you want to make sure nothing you pass on to a Windows user contains a Windows virus .. and unless that was an automated process (such as you're running a mail server) I'd be more likely to scan things I got from one Windows user and planned on passing on to another using something online such as virustotal.

IMHO real time on-access AV scanners in Linux not only use system resources for no benefit, but actually make Linux LESS secure, because at the end of the day for them to work they must have elevated privileges, therefore becoming an attack surface all of their own .. but it's your system, if AV somehow makes you feel safer..... ;)
« Last Edit: April 20, 2017, 03:52:27 pm by PCNetSpec »
WARNING: You are logged into reality as 'root' .. logging in as 'insane' is the only safe option.

Team Peppermint
PCNetSpec

Offline VandiumRoadrunner

  • nOOb
  • *
  • Posts: 23
  • Karma: 0
  • New Forum User
    • View Profile
  • Peppermint version(s): 7
Re: Boot slow after battery was low
« Reply #4 on: April 20, 2017, 07:58:22 pm »
Thanks for the tips about office macros and  AV's. I'm a noob, and learning as I go, so AV was simply one of those regular things that I thought I need.

I purged sophos, but for a weird reason that only shaved of like 5s so I am still booting about 45s.

So running :
Code: [Select]
dmesg
and still have the two errors that I was showed earlier. I'll give more context:
Code: [Select]
[    3.141720] Btrfs loaded
[    3.804340] EXT4-fs (sda1): mounted filesystem with ordered data mode. Opts: (null)
[    3.863894] sd 6:0:0:0: [sdb] 31275008 512-byte logical blocks: (16.0 GB/14.9 GiB)
[    3.864956] sd 6:0:0:0: [sdb] Write Protect is on
[    3.864968] sd 6:0:0:0: [sdb] Mode Sense: 03 00 80 00
[    3.866032] sd 6:0:0:0: [sdb] No Caching mode page found
[    3.866034] sd 6:0:0:0: [sdb] Assuming drive cache: write through
[    3.870796]  sdb: sdb1 sdb2
[    3.874162] sd 6:0:0:0: [sdb] Attached SCSI removable disk
[    3.931702] random: nonblocking pool is initialized
Then I ran what you asked:
Code: [Select]
systemd-analyze critical-chain
I got:
Code: [Select]
The time after the unit is active or started is printed after the "@" character.
The time the unit takes to start is printed after the "+" character.

graphical.target @36.428s
└─multi-user.target @36.415s
  └─smbd.service @36.180s +235ms
    └─nmbd.service @34.405s +1.759s
      └─network-online.target @34.390s
        └─NetworkManager-wait-online.service @28.380s +6.009s
          └─NetworkManager.service @23.191s +5.167s
            └─dbus.service @17.408s
              └─basic.target @17.395s
                └─sockets.target @17.395s
                  └─dbus.socket @17.395s
                    └─sysinit.target @15.890s
                      └─apparmor.service @6.254s +9.635s
                        └─local-fs.target @6.254s
                          └─local-fs-pre.target @6.254s
                            └─systemd-remount-fs.service @6.112s +102ms
                              └─systemd-journald.socket @2.329s
                                └─-.slice @2.313s
then
Code: [Select]
          9.635s apparmor.service
          8.711s dev-sda1.device
          8.417s mintsystem.service
          8.101s timidity.service
          7.758s grub-common.service
          7.301s console-kit-log-system-start.service
          6.810s irqbalance.service
          6.777s networking.service
          6.738s ondemand.service
          6.094s lightdm.service
          6.009s NetworkManager-wait-online.service
          5.167s NetworkManager.service
          2.948s ModemManager.service
          2.793s accounts-daemon.service
          1.896s console-setup.service
          1.849s upower.service
          1.815s systemd-tmpfiles-setup.service
          1.811s systemd-modules-load.service
          1.777s geoclue.service
          1.759s nmbd.service
          1.700s systemd-udevd.service
          1.678s winbind.service
          1.583s samba-ad-dc.service
          1.525s systemd-tmpfiles-setup-dev.service
          1.417s plymouth-start.service
          1.144s udisks2.service
          1.142s systemd-rfkill.service
          1.045s polkitd.service
          1.031s keyboard-setup.service
           896ms iio-sensor-proxy.service
           867ms systemd-journald.service
           845ms binfmt-support.service
           761ms systemd-backlight@backlight:acpi_video0.service
           708ms gpu-manager.service
           618ms systemd-update-utmp.service
           618ms systemd-udev-trigger.service
           541ms ufw.service
           527ms sys-kernel-debug.mount
           525ms dev-hugepages.mount
           449ms dev-mqueue.mount
           441ms systemd-logind.service
lines 1-41

Is Samba causing this problem? I am not sure.


Offline PCNetSpec

  • Administrator
  • Hero
  • *****
  • Posts: 26290
  • Karma: 2855
  • "-rw-rw-rw-" .. The Number Of The Beast
    • View Profile
    • PCNetSpec
  • Peppermint version(s): Peppermint 10
Re: Boot slow after battery was low
« Reply #5 on: April 20, 2017, 08:40:32 pm »
How is this stem connected to your router ? .. wireless ?

Have you set up any kind of network mounts ?

Are you actually using btrfs ? .. if unsure, post the output from:
Code: [Select]
df -T | awk '{print $1,$2,$NF}' | grep "^/dev"
And is this a LiveUSB ?

Are you currently able to write anything to the disk .. such as creating a new file in your home folder ?

What's the output from:
Code: [Select]
sudo fdisk -l
and
Code: [Select]
sudo blkid
and the contents of
Code: [Select]
pluma /etc/fstab
« Last Edit: April 20, 2017, 08:45:05 pm by PCNetSpec »
WARNING: You are logged into reality as 'root' .. logging in as 'insane' is the only safe option.

Team Peppermint
PCNetSpec

Offline VandiumRoadrunner

  • nOOb
  • *
  • Posts: 23
  • Karma: 0
  • New Forum User
    • View Profile
  • Peppermint version(s): 7
Re: Boot slow after battery was low
« Reply #6 on: April 20, 2017, 11:52:41 pm »
Hey PCNetSpec I really appreciate everything your doing. First, I'll give you the outputs of what you asked in the respective order that your requested each four, and then I'll comment at the end.
Code: [Select]
/dev/sda1 ext4 /

Code: [Select]
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: dos
Disk identifier: 0xd42c7b41

Device     Boot      Start        End    Sectors   Size Id Type
/dev/sda1  *          2048 1452673023 1452670976 692.7G 83 Linux
/dev/sda2       1452675070 1465147391   12472322     6G  5 Extended
/dev/sda5       1452675072 1465147391   12472320     6G 82 Linux swap / Solaris


Disk /dev/sdb: 14.9 GiB, 16012804096 bytes, 31275008 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: dos
Disk identifier: 0x00000000

Device     Boot    Start      End  Sectors Size Id Type
/dev/sdb1           8192 25081855 25073664  12G  c W95 FAT32 (LBA)
/dev/sdb2       25081856 31260671  6178816   3G  b W95 FAT32

Code: [Select]
/dev/sda1: UUID="8f755c3f-5150-48b4-bc2a-e669ae8a39e3" TYPE="ext4" PARTUUID="d42c7b41-01"
/dev/sda5: UUID="fff87b78-fd61-4155-8d44-409c7ffb6604" TYPE="swap" PARTUUID="d42c7b41-05"
/dev/sdb1: UUID="A294-B7E0" TYPE="vfat"
/dev/sdb2: UUID="A4ED-EA20" TYPE="vfat"


Code: [Select]
# /etc/fstab: static file system information.
#
# Use 'blkid' to print the universally unique identifier for a
# device; this may be used with UUID= as a more robust way to name devices
# that works even if disks are added and removed. See fstab(5).
#
# <file system> <mount point>   <type>  <options>       <dump>  <pass>
# / was on /dev/sda1 during installation
UUID=8f755c3f-5150-48b4-bc2a-e669ae8a39e3 /               ext4    errors=remount-ro 0       1
# swap was on /dev/sda5 during installation
UUID=fff87b78-fd61-4155-8d44-409c7ffb6604 none            swap    sw              0       0

So, this is how I see the situation. When I originally installed linux, I was replacing a corrupted Windows 7 OS. When I did the partitioning or I knew I had /dev/sda1 and /dev/sda2. This is not a live usb, its on my hard drive. Granted, I do not know if I needed to have these two "files" or "partitions" (I'm sorry, 6 months and still learning the lingo). But, until Wednesday evening, I never say this /dev/sda5 Solaris Swap folder ever (I am referencing when you see the black screen right before you type in your password ones sees something like [files304203420:034230block] and the /dev/sda1 and /dev/sda2 and I have not seen this /dev/sda5 folder. I am confused as to why it is here and what it means. Does my machine detect a usb or port and try to connect to it before it goes to the hard drive and boot Peppermint properly? That is what I am thinking. Is there something in the boot menu F2 or F12 that I can do to fix the problem.

I have no idea how I got into this pickle, I just went from 8% battery to 0% battery on my laptop and then plugged up and rebooted. Sorry for the hassle.

Offline VandiumRoadrunner

  • nOOb
  • *
  • Posts: 23
  • Karma: 0
  • New Forum User
    • View Profile
  • Peppermint version(s): 7
Re: Boot slow after battery was low
« Reply #7 on: April 21, 2017, 12:37:50 am »
So I reread your questions, and I use wireless mostly. I don't "mount" anything as in a usb hotspot or anything like that.

Offline VandiumRoadrunner

  • nOOb
  • *
  • Posts: 23
  • Karma: 0
  • New Forum User
    • View Profile
  • Peppermint version(s): 7
Re: Boot slow after battery was low
« Reply #8 on: April 21, 2017, 01:36:31 am »
On Wednesday when this all happened, I updated two things: Chrome and linux-tools-virtual-hwe-16.04-edge. Could the linux tools have something to do with, and if so could I uninstall the newest versions for the one before?

Offline murraymint

  • Trusted User
  • Veteran
  • *****
  • Posts: 1997
  • Karma: 344
  • soft boiled with a yolk of gold
    • View Profile
  • Peppermint version(s): 7, 8, 9
Re: Boot slow after battery was low
« Reply #9 on: April 21, 2017, 10:47:35 am »
sda5 is your Linux swap partition. It usually gets created automatically at installation and works similarly to the "page file" in Windows. I wouldn't worry about that, it's something that's supposed to be there and shouldn't cause an extra delay.

Offline PCNetSpec

  • Administrator
  • Hero
  • *****
  • Posts: 26290
  • Karma: 2855
  • "-rw-rw-rw-" .. The Number Of The Beast
    • View Profile
    • PCNetSpec
  • Peppermint version(s): Peppermint 10
Re: Boot slow after battery was low
« Reply #10 on: April 21, 2017, 02:52:16 pm »
Okay, can you run:
Code: [Select]
dmesg > ~/Desktop/dmesg.txt
you'll then find a file on your desktop called dmesg.txt

Can you host that online somewhere and post a link to it ?
WARNING: You are logged into reality as 'root' .. logging in as 'insane' is the only safe option.

Team Peppermint
PCNetSpec

Offline VandiumRoadrunner

  • nOOb
  • *
  • Posts: 23
  • Karma: 0
  • New Forum User
    • View Profile
  • Peppermint version(s): 7
Re: Boot slow after battery was low
« Reply #11 on: April 22, 2017, 05:28:06 pm »
sda5 is your Linux swap partition. It usually gets created automatically at installation and works similarly to the "page file" in Windows. I wouldn't worry about that, it's something that's supposed to be there and shouldn't cause an extra delay.

Thanks murraymint:)

Offline VandiumRoadrunner

  • nOOb
  • *
  • Posts: 23
  • Karma: 0
  • New Forum User
    • View Profile
  • Peppermint version(s): 7
Re: Boot slow after battery was low
« Reply #12 on: April 23, 2017, 01:21:34 am »

Offline VandiumRoadrunner

  • nOOb
  • *
  • Posts: 23
  • Karma: 0
  • New Forum User
    • View Profile
  • Peppermint version(s): 7
Re: Boot slow after battery was low
« Reply #13 on: April 23, 2017, 11:59:57 pm »
Hello PCNetSpec

I am writing to say that I have still been looking for a solution online, and I ran across an forum blog that you also assisted on https://linuxforums.org.uk/index.php?topic=12919.15

Can you comment on if the same strategy would work for me? Thanks again.