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Author Topic: How Fast Is Peppermint 7 ?  (Read 15644 times)

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Online VinDSL

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How Fast Is Peppermint 7 ?
« on: June 25, 2016, 12:26:08 am »
Now that we can talk about Peppermint 7, here in the threads ...

I've been playing around with a 'new' machine this week -- new to me, anyway. 

Actually, It's a  3 year-old Dell OptiPlex i5 7010 SFF business desktop refurb.  Hardly a fire breather !

Peppermint 7 beta was already flying, during testing, but after I did a fresh UEFI/Secure Boot install today, it seemed even quicker and faster than before. 

Code: [Select]
vindsl@Boogaloo-4 ~ $ [ -d /sys/firmware/efi ] && echo "Installed in UEFI mode" || echo "Installed in Legacy mode" 
Installed in UEFI mode
vindsl@Boogaloo-4 ~ $ inxi -F
System:    Host: Boogaloo-4 Kernel: 4.4.0-24-generic x86_64 (64 bit) Desktop: N/A Distro: Peppermint Seven
Machine:   System: Dell product: OptiPlex 7010 v: 01
           Mobo: Dell model: 0WR7PY v: A01 Bios: Dell v: A13 date: 03/25/2013
CPU:       Quad core Intel Core i5-3470 (-MCP-) cache: 6144 KB
           clock speeds: max: 3600 MHz 1: 1601 MHz 2: 1626 MHz 3: 1894 MHz 4: 1672 MHz
Graphics:  Card: Intel Xeon E3-1200 v2/3rd Gen Core processor Graphics Controller
           Display Server: X.Org 1.18.3 drivers: intel (unloaded: fbdev,vesa) Resolution: 1280x1024@60.02hz
           GLX Renderer: Mesa DRI Intel Ivybridge Desktop GLX Version: 3.0 Mesa 11.2.0
Audio:     Card Intel 7 Series/C210 Series Family High Definition Audio Controller driver: snd_hda_intel
           Sound: Advanced Linux Sound Architecture v: k4.4.0-24-generic
Network:   Card: Intel 82579LM Gigabit Network Connection driver: e1000e
           IF: eno1 state: up speed: 1000 Mbps duplex: full mac: b8:ca:3a:93:3d:d9
Drives:    HDD Total Size: 250.1GB (2.3% used) ID-1: /dev/sda model: Samsung_SSD_850 size: 250.1GB
Partition: ID-1: / size: 9.8G used: 3.5G (38%) fs: ext4 dev: /dev/sda5
           ID-2: /home size: 18G used: 73M (1%) fs: ext4 dev: /dev/sda6
           ID-3: swap-1 size: 2.15GB used: 0.00GB (0%) fs: swap dev: /dev/sda7
RAID:      No RAID devices: /proc/mdstat, md_mod kernel module present
Sensors:   System Temperatures: cpu: 29.8C mobo: 27.8C
           Fan Speeds (in rpm): cpu: N/A
Info:      Processes: 180 Uptime: 15 min Memory: 668.5/15934.5MB Client: Shell (bash) inxi: 2.2.35
vindsl@Boogaloo-4 ~ $ 





To make sure it wasn't wishful thinking, I put it to the test using 'systemd-bootchart'.  Bootchart doesn't lie  ;D

Here's the resultant boot time (7.4 seconds) ...





I'll have to say, this is fastest boot time I've ever recorded, on any machine, at any time, on any distro.

And, there's no doubt in my mind that UEFI/Secure Boot is faster than Legacy Mode on this machine.

Anybody else notice a speed difference between these two boot modes ?
« Last Edit: July 05, 2016, 09:59:42 pm by VinDSL, Reason: Redacted Title »

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Re: How Fast Is Peppermint 7 ? UEFI/Secure Boot vs Legacy Mode
« Reply #1 on: June 25, 2016, 07:36:30 am »
BTW, no reason to reinvent the wheel, so to speak.

if anyone is interested in experimenting with UEFI/Secure Boot on Peppermint 7 ...

Here's an excellent up-to-date tutorial:  https://help.ubuntu.com/community/UEFI

While you're reading it, just mentally replace the word 'Ubuntu' with 'Peppermint'   ;)


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Re: How Fast Is Peppermint 7 ? UEFI/Secure Boot vs Legacy Mode
« Reply #2 on: June 25, 2016, 03:42:30 pm »
Can't say I've *noticed* a difference, but then I've never really looked for one .. interesting question though.
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Re: How Fast Is Peppermint 7 ? UEFI/Secure Boot vs Legacy Mode
« Reply #3 on: July 02, 2016, 02:43:17 am »
Got back from a grueling week in Vegas, today -- tired, beat-up, and sick.  I walked so much, I lost 11 pounds.  Either that, or it was those 40% off hookers ...

I spent the last couple of hours reading 4 pages of 'unread posts' -- all good stuff.  I love this community !

One of the posts reminded me of this thread, so I decided to revisit it.   I was right in the middle of experimenting when I had to pinch it off and leave town.

Bottom line:  I knocked another second off my boot time by removing the butter tools and smbd ( 7.3 seconds=>6.3 seconds ).




If anyone wants to play around with this hack, here's what I did ...

Code: [Select]
vindsl@Boogaloo-4 ~ $ systemctl status smbd
● smbd.service - LSB: start Samba SMB/CIFS daemon (smbd)
   Loaded: loaded (/etc/init.d/smbd; bad; vendor preset: enabled)
   Active: active (running) since Fri 2016-07-01 18:30:51 MST; 3h 54min ago
     Docs: man:systemd-sysv-generator(8)
  Process: 1704 ExecStart=/etc/init.d/smbd start (code=exited, status=0/SUCCESS)
   CGroup: /system.slice/smbd.service
           ├─1721 /usr/sbin/smbd -D
           ├─1722 /usr/sbin/smbd -D
           └─1724 /usr/sbin/smbd -D

Jul 01 18:30:51 Boogaloo-4 systemd[1]: Starting LSB: start Samba SMB/CIFS daemon
Jul 01 18:30:51 Boogaloo-4 smbd[1704]:  * Starting SMB/CIFS daemon smbd
Jul 01 18:30:51 Boogaloo-4 smbd[1704]:    ...done.
Jul 01 18:30:51 Boogaloo-4 systemd[1]: Started LSB: start Samba SMB/CIFS daemon
Jul 01 18:51:36 Boogaloo-4 smbd[2662]: pam_unix(samba:session): session closed f
Jul 01 19:23:41 Boogaloo-4 smbd[3161]: pam_unix(samba:session): session closed f
Jul 01 19:55:41 Boogaloo-4 smbd[3504]: pam_unix(samba:session): session closed f
Jul 01 20:27:41 Boogaloo-4 smbd[4027]: pam_unix(samba:session): session closed f
Jul 01 20:59:41 Boogaloo-4 smbd[4454]: pam_unix(samba:session): session closed f
Jul 01 21:31:41 Boogaloo-4 smbd[5074]: pam_unix(samba:session): session closed f

[1]+  Stopped                 systemctl status smbd
vindsl@Boogaloo-4 ~ $ sudo netstat -tlnp
[sudo] password for vindsl:
Active Internet connections (only servers)
Proto Recv-Q Send-Q Local Address           Foreign Address         State       PID/Program name
tcp        0      0 0.0.0.0:139             0.0.0.0:*               LISTEN      1721/smbd       
tcp        0      0 127.0.1.1:53            0.0.0.0:*               LISTEN      1371/dnsmasq   
tcp        0      0 0.0.0.0:445             0.0.0.0:*               LISTEN      1721/smbd       
tcp6       0      0 :::139                  :::*                    LISTEN      1721/smbd       
tcp6       0      0 :::445                  :::*                    LISTEN      1721/smbd       
vindsl@Boogaloo-4 ~ $

Samba is a useless drain to me.  No reason to have it listening for output.  Dittos for btrfs-tools @ startup.  So, I purged them both.

Code: [Select]
vindsl@Boogaloo-4 ~ $ service smbd stop
vindsl@Boogaloo-4 ~ $ sudo apt-get remove samba-common --purge
[sudo] password for vindsl:
Reading package lists... Done
Building dependency tree       
Reading state information... Done
The following packages were automatically installed and are no longer required:
  libaio1 libfile-copy-recursive-perl libuser1 python-dnspython python-libuser
  samba-dsdb-modules samba-vfs-modules tdb-tools update-inetd
Use 'sudo apt autoremove' to remove them.
The following packages will be REMOVED:
  cifs-utils* samba* samba-common* samba-common-bin* smbclient*
  system-config-samba*
0 upgraded, 0 newly installed, 6 to remove and 16 not upgraded.
After this operation, 19.6 MB disk space will be freed.
Do you want to continue? [Y/n] y
(Reading database ... 188236 files and directories currently installed.)
Removing cifs-utils (2:6.4-1ubuntu1) ...
Purging configuration files for cifs-utils (2:6.4-1ubuntu1) ...
Removing system-config-samba (1.2.63-0ubuntu6) ...
Removing samba (2:4.3.9+dfsg-0ubuntu0.16.04.2) ...
Purging configuration files for samba (2:4.3.9+dfsg-0ubuntu0.16.04.2) ...
Removing smbclient (2:4.3.9+dfsg-0ubuntu0.16.04.2) ...
Removing samba-common-bin (2:4.3.9+dfsg-0ubuntu0.16.04.2) ...
Removing samba-common (2:4.3.9+dfsg-0ubuntu0.16.04.2) ...
Purging configuration files for samba-common (2:4.3.9+dfsg-0ubuntu0.16.04.2) ...
Processing triggers for man-db (2.7.5-1) ...
Processing triggers for desktop-file-utils (0.22-1ubuntu5) ...
Processing triggers for mime-support (3.59ubuntu1) ...
Processing triggers for hicolor-icon-theme (0.15-0ubuntu1) ...
Processing triggers for libc-bin (2.23-0ubuntu3) ...
vindsl@Boogaloo-4 ~ $ rm -Rf /etc/samba
vindsl@Boogaloo-4 ~ $ sudo apt-get autoremove
Reading package lists... Done
Building dependency tree       
Reading state information... Done
The following packages will be REMOVED:
  libaio1 libfile-copy-recursive-perl libuser1 python-crypto python-dnspython
  python-ldb python-libuser python-samba python-tdb samba-dsdb-modules
  samba-vfs-modules tdb-tools update-inetd
0 upgraded, 0 newly installed, 13 to remove and 16 not upgraded.
After this operation, 12.9 MB disk space will be freed.
Do you want to continue? [Y/n] y
(Reading database ... 186742 files and directories currently installed.)
Removing samba-vfs-modules (2:4.3.9+dfsg-0ubuntu0.16.04.2) ...
Removing libaio1:amd64 (0.3.110-2) ...
Removing update-inetd (4.43) ...
Removing libfile-copy-recursive-perl (0.38-1) ...
Removing python-libuser (1:0.60~dfsg-1.2) ...
Removing libuser1 (1:0.60~dfsg-1.2) ...
Removing python-samba (2:4.3.9+dfsg-0ubuntu0.16.04.2) ...
Removing python-crypto (2.6.1-6build1) ...
Removing python-dnspython (1.12.0-1) ...
Removing python-ldb (2:1.1.24-1ubuntu3) ...
Removing python-tdb (1.3.8-2) ...
Removing samba-dsdb-modules (2:4.3.9+dfsg-0ubuntu0.16.04.2) ...
Removing tdb-tools (1.3.8-2) ...
Processing triggers for libc-bin (2.23-0ubuntu3) ...
Processing triggers for man-db (2.7.5-1) ...
vindsl@Boogaloo-4 ~ $ sudo apt-get purge samba-libs
Reading package lists... Done
Building dependency tree       
Reading state information... Done
The following packages will be REMOVED:
  gvfs-backends* libsmbclient* python-smbc* samba-libs* vlc-plugin-samba*
0 upgraded, 0 newly installed, 5 to remove and 16 not upgraded.
After this operation, 24.8 MB disk space will be freed.
Do you want to continue? [Y/n] y
(Reading database ... 186082 files and directories currently installed.)
Removing gvfs-backends (1.28.2-1ubuntu1~16.04.1) ...
Removing vlc-plugin-samba (2.2.2-5) ...
Purging configuration files for vlc-plugin-samba (2.2.2-5) ...
Removing python-smbc (1.0.15.5-1) ...
Removing libsmbclient:amd64 (2:4.3.9+dfsg-0ubuntu0.16.04.2) ...
Removing samba-libs:amd64 (2:4.3.9+dfsg-0ubuntu0.16.04.2) ...
Processing triggers for libglib2.0-0:amd64 (2.48.1-1~ubuntu16.04.1) ...
Processing triggers for gconf2 (3.2.6-3ubuntu6) ...
Processing triggers for vlc-nox (2.2.2-5) ...
Processing triggers for libc-bin (2.23-0ubuntu3) ...
Processing triggers for man-db (2.7.5-1) ...
vindsl@Boogaloo-4 ~ $

Nice and clean now -- little snappier, too ...

Code: [Select]
vindsl@Boogaloo-4 ~ $ systemctl status smbd
● smbd.service
   Loaded: not-found (Reason: No such file or directory)
   Active: inactive (dead)
vindsl@Boogaloo-4 ~ $ sudo netstat -tlnp
[sudo] password for vindsl:
Active Internet connections (only servers)
Proto Recv-Q Send-Q Local Address           Foreign Address         State       PID/Program name
tcp        0      0 127.0.1.1:53            0.0.0.0:*               LISTEN      1245/dnsmasq   
vindsl@Boogaloo-4 ~ $

Only problem I ran across, using the above commands, was Nemo wouldn't connect to FTPS and SCP locations afterward.  So, I had to backtrack a little, and reinstall gvfs-backends and the smb client (but not the server).

Code: [Select]
vindsl@Boogaloo-4 ~ $ sudo apt-get install gvfs-backends
[sudo] password for vindsl:
Reading package lists... Done
Building dependency tree       
Reading state information... Done
The following additional packages will be installed:
  libsmbclient samba-libs
Suggested packages:
  samba-common
The following NEW packages will be installed:
  gvfs-backends libsmbclient samba-libs
0 upgraded, 3 newly installed, 0 to remove and 16 not upgraded.
Need to get 5,526 kB of archives.
After this operation, 24.7 MB of additional disk space will be used.
Do you want to continue? [Y/n] y
Get:1 http://us.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu xenial-updates/main amd64 samba-libs amd64 2:4.3.9+dfsg-0ubuntu0.16.04.2 [5,172 kB]
Get:2 http://us.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu xenial-updates/main amd64 libsmbclient amd64 2:4.3.9+dfsg-0ubuntu0.16.04.2 [53.2 kB]
Get:3 http://us.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu xenial-updates/main amd64 gvfs-backends amd64 1.28.2-1ubuntu1~16.04.1 [301 kB]
Fetched 5,526 kB in 6s (846 kB/s)                                             
Selecting previously unselected package samba-libs:amd64.
(Reading database ... 185834 files and directories currently installed.)
Preparing to unpack .../samba-libs_2%3a4.3.9+dfsg-0ubuntu0.16.04.2_amd64.deb ...
Unpacking samba-libs:amd64 (2:4.3.9+dfsg-0ubuntu0.16.04.2) ...
Selecting previously unselected package libsmbclient:amd64.
Preparing to unpack .../libsmbclient_2%3a4.3.9+dfsg-0ubuntu0.16.04.2_amd64.deb ...
Unpacking libsmbclient:amd64 (2:4.3.9+dfsg-0ubuntu0.16.04.2) ...
Selecting previously unselected package gvfs-backends.
Preparing to unpack .../gvfs-backends_1.28.2-1ubuntu1~16.04.1_amd64.deb ...
Unpacking gvfs-backends (1.28.2-1ubuntu1~16.04.1) ...
Processing triggers for libc-bin (2.23-0ubuntu3) ...
Processing triggers for man-db (2.7.5-1) ...
Processing triggers for gconf2 (3.2.6-3ubuntu6) ...
Processing triggers for libglib2.0-0:amd64 (2.48.1-1~ubuntu16.04.1) ...
Setting up samba-libs:amd64 (2:4.3.9+dfsg-0ubuntu0.16.04.2) ...
Setting up libsmbclient:amd64 (2:4.3.9+dfsg-0ubuntu0.16.04.2) ...
Setting up gvfs-backends (1.28.2-1ubuntu1~16.04.1) ...
Processing triggers for libc-bin (2.23-0ubuntu3) ...
vindsl@Boogaloo-4 ~ $

Think I'll see if I can get boot times down to 5 seconds now ...   

Isn't Peppermint fun ?  8)

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Re: How Fast Is Peppermint 7 ? UEFI/Secure Boot vs Legacy Mode
« Reply #4 on: July 02, 2016, 07:23:32 am »
Yeah there's definitely stuff in PM7 that's unnecessary for a lot of users, smbd being a prime example.

I think a lot of the speed improvements from Peppermint 7 is systemd .. there's no doubt it's faster .. I'm still undecided about it though.

Not so sure UEFI adds anything to the equation though .. maybe, maybe it can initialise hardware faster somehow but that to me just doesn't 'sound' right if you get my meaning.
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Re: How Fast Is Peppermint 7 ? UEFI/Secure Boot vs Legacy Mode
« Reply #5 on: July 02, 2016, 09:41:45 am »
taken from the Linux Mint 18 page

Quote
Note also that samba was removed in the stable release as it negatively impacted boot speed. To remove samba, open a terminal and type “apt purge samba”

Confirming your findings +VinDSL

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Re: How Fast Is Peppermint 7 ? UEFI/Secure Boot vs Legacy Mode
« Reply #6 on: July 02, 2016, 03:09:48 pm »
I applied the usual SSD 'tricks' last night ...
  • Execute TRIM via daily cron
  • Lowered swapiness to '1'
  • Disabled "access time stamps' in fstab
  • Set caching to '0' in Fx
  • Made sure the scheduler was set to '[deadline]'
These tweaks are mostly for SSD longevity, but they also serve to speed up daily operation.

Still only have consistent 6 second boot times, but piece-of-mind knowing I'm not hammering my new SSD.   8)

That said, it's probably a good thing to include smbd common in the distro.  Probably saves a lot of headaches, from a support point-of-view.
« Last Edit: July 30, 2016, 11:05:56 pm by VinDSL, Reason: Typo Demon Strikes Again »

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Re: How Fast Is Peppermint 7 ? UEFI/Secure Boot vs Legacy Mode
« Reply #7 on: July 02, 2016, 03:31:26 pm »
I applied the usual SSD 'tricks' last night ...
  • Execute TRIM via daily cron
  • Lowed swapiness to '1'
  • Disabled "access time stamps' in fstab
  • Set caching to '0' in Fx
  • Made sure the scheduler was set to '[deadline]'
These tweaks are mostly for SSD longevity, but they also serve to speed up daily operation.

Still only have consistent 6 second boot times, but piece-of-mind knowing I'm not hammering my new SSD.   8)

That said, it's probably a good thing to include smbd common in the distro.  Probably saves a lot of headaches, from a support point-of-view.
That's basically how I've got my SSD set up.  I've the cache that's in /tmp mounted to RAM.  I've your link to SSD tweaks.  I also use this one for some additional stuff: http://www.howtogeek.com/62761/how-to-tweak-your-ssd-in-ubuntu-for-better-performance/  It all seems to work really.  My Dell latitude 3610 is a screamer  :o!!
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Re: How Fast Is Peppermint 7 ? UEFI/Secure Boot vs Legacy Mode
« Reply #8 on: July 02, 2016, 04:46:49 pm »
I also use this one for some additional stuff: http://www.howtogeek.com/62761/how-to-tweak-your-ssd-in-ubuntu-for-better-performance/  It all seems to work really. 

I'm looking at that page, as I type.  Must be an older article ... yep, "Published 05/11/11"

I just started using 'nodiratime' too, but I'll probably remove it.  Evidently, 'nodiratime' is included in the 'noatime' subset (ArchWiki - atime options).

Also, I've never been a fan of 'discard'.  TRIM is a much better option IMO, if your SSD supports it.

Code: [Select]
vindsl@Boogaloo-4 ~ $ sudo hdparm -I /dev/sda | grep "TRIM supported"
[sudo] password for vindsl:
   * Data Set Management TRIM supported (limit 8 blocks)
vindsl@Boogaloo-4 ~ $

Judging by the age of the article, a lot of SSDs probably didn't support TRIM, so 'discard' was the only way to go.

'[deadline]' is now specified by default (I guess).  All I did was check the scheduler to make sure.

Code: [Select]
vindsl@Boogaloo-4 ~ $ cat /sys/block/sda/queue/scheduler
noop [deadline] cfq
vindsl@Boogaloo-4 ~ $

I'm going to try mounting the system cache in ram instead of /tmp and see what happens - sounds very compelling ...

Code: [Select]
# /etc/fstab: static file system information.
#
# Use 'blkid' to print the universally unique identifier for a
# device; this may be used with UUID= as a more robust way to name devices
# that works even if disks are added and removed. See fstab(5).
#
# <file system> <mount point>   <type>  <options>       <dump>  <pass>
# / was on /dev/sda5 during installation
UUID=939e3fa8-ebcb-455c-9362-0ba5eefb8309 /              ext4   nodiratime,noatime,errors=remount-ro   0   1
# /boot/efi was on /dev/sda1 during installation
UUID=3647-2F8F  /boot/efi vfat umask=0077                                                              0   1
# /home was on /dev/sda6 during installation
UUID=2bfc9d5d-e6e5-47fa-b3c8-851c1ef2eee2 /home          ext4   nodiratime,noatime,defaults            0   2
# swap was on /dev/sda7 during installation
UUID=fb3d197b-6f63-4d37-8f4f-44f55300c935 none           swap   sw                                     0   0
# mount system cache in ram instead of /tmp
tmpfs /tmp tmpfs defaults,noatime,mode=1777                                                            0   0

And, I'll try the 'exit 0' hack ...

Code: [Select]
vindsl@Boogaloo-4 ~ $ cat  /etc/rc.local
#!/bin/sh -e
#
# rc.local
#
# This script is executed at the end of each multiuser runlevel.
# Make sure that the script will "exit 0" on success or any other
# value on error.
#
# In order to enable or disable this script just change the execution
# bits.
#
# By default this script does nothing.

echo deadline > /sys/block/sda/queue/scheduler
echo 1 > /sys/block/sda/queue/iosched/fifo_batch
exit 0
vindsl@Boogaloo-4 ~ $

Nothing ventured, nothing gained, eh what ?   ;D

I restart now ...

Thx, Andy !
« Last Edit: July 02, 2016, 04:51:07 pm by VinDSL, Reason: Addendum »

Offline AndyInMokum

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Re: How Fast Is Peppermint 7 ? UEFI/Secure Boot vs Legacy Mode
« Reply #9 on: July 02, 2016, 05:07:32 pm »
Yeah, I've turned off the weekly scheduled TRIM.  I have TRIM run on my /root and /home partitions each time I boot.  It then writes a log.   It slows booting a little, maybe by one or two seconds. I don't care about that though.  The Dell still boots up PDQ.   I didn't think about nodiratime being a subset of noatime.  I'll remove it from my fstab entries.  I thought 16.04 used the cfq IO Scheduler by default.  Ubuntu 14.04 certainly did.  I'll have to check that.  Yeah, definitely use deadline.  I'm going to try the exit 0 too.  See what happens.  Thank for the tips  ;).
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Re: How Fast Is Peppermint 7 ? UEFI/Secure Boot vs Legacy Mode
« Reply #10 on: July 02, 2016, 05:13:07 pm »
what "exit 0" hack ?

Unless I'm misunderstanding you .. you do realise "exit 0" at the end of a script just simply returns a "0" exit status .. it doesn't do anything else.
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Re: How Fast Is Peppermint 7 ? UEFI/Secure Boot vs Legacy Mode
« Reply #11 on: July 02, 2016, 08:29:04 pm »
what "exit 0" hack ?

Unless I'm misunderstanding you .. you do realise "exit 0" at the end of a script just simply returns a "0" exit status .. it doesn't do anything else.

Hack the do-nothing script -- add a couple of lines of code, so it does do something.

Really, I don't know why you would want to use:

Code: [Select]
echo deadline > /sys/block/sda/queue/scheduler

Paranoia maybe ?!?!?  Why would you want to temporarily assign the I/O scheduler (deadline, in this case) to a particular drive when it's already permanent ?

Dittos with:

Code: [Select]
echo 1 > /sys/block/sda/queue/iosched/fifo_batch

I don't understand the author's reasoning.  Maybe he was afraid some rouge update/upgrade would change the scheduler back to noop or cfg  :-\

Doesn't actually hurt anything, sooooo ...
« Last Edit: July 02, 2016, 08:31:36 pm by VinDSL, Reason: Addendum »

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Re: How Fast Is Peppermint 7 ? UEFI/Secure Boot vs Legacy Mode
« Reply #12 on: July 02, 2016, 08:34:56 pm »
Yeah, I've turned off the weekly scheduled TRIM.

I just moved the cron from cron.weekly to cron.daily:

Code: [Select]
vindsl@Boogaloo-4 ~ $ sudo mv -v /etc/cron.weekly/fstrim /etc/cron.daily/fstrim

Simple pimple !   :)

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Re: How Fast Is Peppermint 7 ? UEFI/Secure Boot vs Legacy Mode
« Reply #13 on: July 04, 2016, 11:04:50 pm »
Alrighty, then.  YaY Peppermint 7 !

Knocked another 2 seconds off the boot time  (6.3 =>4.3 seconds)



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Re: How Fast Is Peppermint 7 ? UEFI/Secure Boot vs Legacy Mode
« Reply #14 on: July 04, 2016, 11:35:51 pm »
Why not ditch apparmor ?
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