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Author Topic: Peppermint 6 as the base for the real time kernel with ubuntu-studio-audio  (Read 3703 times)

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Offline Roger Peartree

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I'm gonna try this build as if it was a Fast N'Loud (Discovery Channel show about cars) merge of 2 cars into one. I love Peppermint 6 mix of xfwm4 + LXDE + Nemo file manager. A regular install is super fast and requires way less RAM and resources than a conventional Ubuntu Studio 15.10 (Xfce) installation.
Now I'm posting this because someone may have done it before me and I would like to get some feedback on this, specially on issues that might arise with using the Linux real time kernel. Will the system integrate well with the Ubuntu Studio audio packages? Will I have issues with Jack? Will Pulseaudio work just fine? Can I use the real time kernel with Peppermint without any problems? These questions and many others could use some feedback from Peppermint users that are musically wired. I think Peppermint 6 deserves some experimentation and I'm all about risking something to learn something.
Besides I think that if I can make it work, it will be awesome for Peppermint, since we could get the attention of some Linux users that are into music.
If my experience is faster and more efficient than pure Xfce, on my system, then it means it will be blazing fast on modern computers.
I think it will work, I'll just have to put a lot of work into it.
For that I will use the good old Acer Aspire One D260, with the Intel Atom N455 CPU, one physical core, but 2 threads (yeah it has Hyperthreading), Intel Speed Step (clock can be at 998 Mhz, 1.33 Ghz and 1.67 Ghz) which has 4 steps, from zero to maximum. GPU is the GMA 3150 Intel Integrated Graphics (which sucks but not that much...) clocked at 200 Mhz. RAM is only 1 GB, DDR2, clocked at 667 Mhz.
Let's have a look at the inxi -F output:
Code: [Select]
roger@netstation:~$ inxi -F
System:    Host: netstation Kernel: 4.2.0-22-generic i686 (32 bit)
           Desktop: Xfce 4.12.3 Distro: Ubuntu 15.10 wily
Machine:   Mobo: Acer model: AOD260 v: V3.16(DDR3)
           Bios: Acer v: V3.16(DDR3) date: 11/07/2011
CPU:       Single core Intel Atom N455 (-HT-) cache: 512 KB
           clock speeds: max: 1666 MHz 1: 1666 MHz 2: 1666 MHz
Graphics:  Card: Intel Atom Processor D4xx/D5xx/N4xx/N5xx Integrated Graphics Controller
           Display Server: X.Org 1.17.2 drivers: intel (unloaded: fbdev,vesa)
           Resolution: 1280x1024@60.02hz
           GLX Renderer: Mesa DRI Intel Pineview M x86/MMX/SSE2
           GLX Version: 1.4 Mesa 11.0.2
Audio:     Card Intel NM10/ICH7 Family High Definition Audio Controller
           driver: snd_hda_intel
           Sound: Advanced Linux Sound Architecture v: k4.2.0-22-generic
Network:   Card-1: Qualcomm Atheros AR8152 v1.1 Fast Ethernet driver: atl1c
           IF: enp1s0 state: up speed: 100 Mbps duplex: full
           mac: 88:ae:1d:1a:c8:98
           Card-2: Qualcomm Atheros AR9285 Wireless Network Adapter (PCI-Express)
           driver: ath9k
           IF: wlp2s0 state: down mac: 78:e4:00:02:46:19
Drives:    HDD Total Size: 161.1GB (10.9% used)
           ID-1: /dev/sda model: WDC_WD1600BEVT size: 160.0GB
           ID-2: USB /dev/sdb model: DataTraveler_2.0 size: 1.0GB
Partition: ID-1: / size: 24G used: 15G (64%) fs: ext4 dev: /dev/sda1
           ID-2: swap-1 size: 2.14GB used: 0.01GB (0%) fs: swap dev: /dev/sda4
RAID:      No RAID devices: /proc/mdstat, md_mod kernel module present
Sensors:   System Temperatures: cpu: 55.0C mobo: N/A
           Fan Speeds (in rpm): cpu: N/A
Info:      Processes: 152 Uptime: 1:48 Memory: 476.7/989.8MB
           Client: Shell (bash) inxi: 2.2.16

So this is the thingie running Ubuntu 15.10 on sda1 and I have Ubuntu Studio on sda3 (swap on sda4 and NTFS data storage on sda2).
You can see the USB pen with Peppermint 6 connected (yay! the Peppermint 6 ISO fits in an old 1 GB pen drive!).
Now I will install Peppermint 6 over my Ubuntu Studio 15.10 (don't worry the image was backed up using Pinguy Builder) and then I will proceed to install the real time kernel from the 4x branch and the ubuntu-studio-audio; ubuntu-studio-audio plugins, DJ apps, etc into Peppermint 6.
I think it will work and it has a plus (a very important one!): In Ubuntu Studio 15.10 I can't add my repositories for FFMPEG and other packages like WinFF because they are only supported in the Trusty 14.04.3 version. Using these repos in 15.10 leads to regression problems and a lot of broken packages.
But if I use Peppermint 6 those repos will then be fully compatible. I tested the live session of Peppermint 6 and all works just fine and it has the necessary Ubuntu Trusty based packages in Synaptic (gotta love Synaptic!!! It's there by default!) This is another strong point to love Peppermint, if you know your Debian and Buntus, then no problem in using as many repos as you need.
Well enough talk, now let's do the deed! I will probably leave Peppermint 6 installing later on today and go out for New Year's Eve but, being a Linux  addict, I'll be already working on this build tomorrow, as soon as I wake up and get my hot cocoa.
I like names for projects so I will call this one: Peppermint 6 Music Workers Red Edition. Red because I'll use the 4x kernel. I'm thinking about a Blue Edition using the 3x kernel branch but first let's do the bleeding edge stuff.
Hey, if this works, we can all add another super capability to Peppermint: able to run a fully featured Music, Sound & DJ oriented distro in one GB of RAM, on older machines, with older CPU+GPU combinations.
Dang I'll even make an ISO out of the Red Edition and put it on Google Drive so more users can have a go on trying Peppermint Music Workers (but first I will have to ask Peppermint authorization on this and they are fully entitled to refuse it so... Keep your feet on the ground).
Of course I'll have to figure out all of the bugs and etc but I don't mind working on that. You know why? Because I do love Peppermint! It has xfwm4, LXDE base, Nemo file manager and now, hopefully, will have full Audio production integration.
And if you're only into DJ stuff I promise you'll have some cool packages to go, out of the box, such as Mixxx and Internet DJ Console.
If you're into Music playing and composition you'll have way more apps to run out of the box. Even for people that just wish a Multimedia play distro I will be using some of the best Multimedia apps available in Linux, with Hi-Fi quality and tweaked settings for my favorite Audio and Video apps.

Get you some of this! Now, just wish me good luck. I will post my progress on this topic, at the end of each day, until I achieve the "stable" status.
You all have a nice, fun and cool New Year!
« Last Edit: December 31, 2015, 03:25:39 pm by AndyInMokum »

Offline PCNetSpec

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Re: Peppermint 6 as the base for the real time kernel with ubuntu-studio-audio
« Reply #1 on: December 31, 2015, 11:23:47 am »
Hi Roger, and welcome to the forum :)

That's one brilliantly enthusiastic attitude you have there .. I don't see any problems with the kernel update (and/or realtime version) on that hardware.

Pulseaudio is already installed

and I can see no reason the Ubuntu studio packages wouldn't work if they work with Ubuntu 14.04 and 14.04.2

Whilst we're happy for people to modify Peppermint in any way they see fit, and/or to create modified ISO's for family and friends (as long as they understand it's not the official spin), releasing a non official spin "into the wild" with the Peppermint branding and references still in place would definitely not be allowed.

I wish you luck with your customisations, and look forward to following your progress .. hey you never know, an "official" Peppermint Studio edition isn't an impossibility if there's enough demand.

Oh, and Happy new year to you too :)
WARNING: You are logged into reality as 'root' .. logging in as 'insane' is the only safe option.

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Offline Roger Peartree

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Ah I'm at a brick wall... Peppermint installation is fast! Under 20 minutes. Of course it's a small ISO so there are many benefits from that (and not a single  negative aspect! Hey this is a cloud-oriented distribution!). So all peachy for me since the dreadfull "invisible mouse pointer/cursor bug" that apparently affects only the Aspire One D260 hardware, it's me and 3 other guys at the Ubuntu forums, after any installation of any of the 14.04 Trusty ISO's, in all DE's, including Xubuntu, Ubuntu and Lubuntu. So in that respect Peppermint does a good job, thanks to it's trusted Linux Mint base, since in none of the Xfce Mints this invisible mouse bug occurs. So both Mint and Peppermint are built on (will I dare say it?) a stronger base than any of the 14.04 Buntu's.
Whereas the 3 Buntu's (Ubuntu, Xubuntu and Lubuntu, sorry, I hate KDE and Mate!) fail, both Peppermint and Mint shine. No stupid bugs, super-solid foundation, out-of-box Hibernation (a must for older low-RAM systems) and amazing stability coupled with outstanding performance, even in an old system like this. I must say that I was quite happy with the default Peppermint installation. The next changes are of cosmetic customizations and taming the Nemo file manager to meet your own preferences. That was quite easy but not until you get Nemo to show you the compact view on any new folder that you open. I later understood that you have to log out and back in before Nemo writes your configuration on stone. A nag is that the mouse threshold for resizing windows is about ONE pixel wide and it sucks to have to move your pointer a lot until it hits the sweet spot!  Installing Aptik to get back your PPA, installed packages, application settings and your custom Icons and Themes it's as easy as dancing this with the terminal: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:teejee2008/ppa -y && sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install aptik.
Don't know about Aptik? Well if you wanna backup the settings and more for your installation without doing a Filezilla image backup, this is an essential tool because it will save you time at getting back your customizations. The Ravefinity PPA will give you back their awesome XFCE-LXDE themes and you can backup your favorite Icons and app settings. Aptik will save you 2 hours of work and it works fine under Peppermint. So far as I know it only works on Debian based distributions, but if you're with Peppermint you are already using the rock-solid Debian base.
That's the cool part. Everything works without bugs after a Peppermint installation.
Now about those brick walls: inexplicably, when you install the ubuntu-studio-audio and the ubuntu-studio-plugins, from Synaptic, you see after starting the process, that it is pulling wine1.6 packages and shebangs into your distro and then, if you're not a big fan of Wine, like me (bloated, insecure, if you want Windows software then run Windows and get out of the Linux way... etc...) if you're not a big fan you'll want to get rid of it, specially because it occupies a lot of space in your disk. You will then face the first bug: in Synaptic when you select wine1.6 i368 package (the 32 bit support) you will get a broken package flag and you won't be able to remove that thingie. Solution? There's always one: select the i386 package and in the Synaptic menu, tick the Force Version box, then go back to the removal stage and now Synaptic will remove that broken package (no way Synaptic will be able to fix the broken package, you have that option on the menu but it won't work).
Ok now when I think all is peachy and I can go back to business, testing Jack MIDI and my Creative Audio X-Fi external audio card, both work fine out of the box, the necessary drivers are in the Linux kernel already, the specific Creative Audio X-Fi drivers AND the MIDI-to-USB cable drivers are ALREADY in the Linux kernel!!! Gotta love Linus Torvald's work. So I log out and back in and...
Aye! A black screen with a cursor blinking at the top... Doing "reboot" or "sudo reboot" does nothing. I have to do an hardware button reset.
Rebooting is just fine, I get Grub, select Peppermint to boot, the Peppermint plymouth theme appears just fine and when it's time to go to the desktop, and showing you the login screen, all you get is a black screen with a blinking cursor up there. A dead cursor since it won't matter the command you input into it, it won't do anything.
So I broke the Peppermint installation. But that can't be the end of it. I will try again. this time I will try to pull the ubuntu-audio and ubuntu-audio-plugins from the 15.10 reposistories but for that I would have to modify the Peppermint repos... I'll see if it's possible to add the 15.10 repos alongside the 14.04.3 Trusty repos, although it looks like a mess already hahaha! I think these problems will be solved with the next 16.04 LTS from Ubuntu so perhaps now it's not the right time frame for my project. Still I'm gonna reinstall Peppermint 6 and then instead of just pulling all the ubuntu-studio 14.04.3 audio packages I'll go one by one, or better, a group of related packages now and the next later, doing backups along the way. I hope I can isolate the problems and preserve the Peppermint 6 installation. One thing I can tell you right now: Peppermint works fine with the real-time 4.x kernel. No problems in that. The real time kernel runs fine in Peppermint and it is as if Peppermint itself is comfortable running the 4.x branch. That's a big plus!
As for the custom ISO I'm not gonna do that. I mean I can do it for myself and use it but I won't distribute the ISO to the public in any form. That's off limits, we gotta understand that the Peppermint devs spend a lot of time with this awesome distro, and that's why it's awesome: it's a labor of Love.
Please, if you like the distro and use it on a daily basis, then donate to the Peppermint devs. If you don't have much money donate the value of a Coffee or a Cappuccino, you would do that for your best friend or girlfriend wouldn't you? So even 2 or 3 /$/ make a difference and for you that's easy.
In the meantime, if you have Peppermint 6 installed, just enjoy it. It has Ice, you won't find that awesome Cloud solution in any other distro, it's blazing fast on older hardware so it kinda light speeds on modern computers, it's all instantly done. It's super-power efficient, will make your laptop battery last  longer and so many other sweet touches... Man this is one of the few distros where I didn't need to change the wallpaper coz the default is so cool that you don't even need to think about that! I'm not only amazed but convinced: I prefer to run Peppermint than Linux Mint Xfce. It's way more cool and fast! So is this the end of Peppermint Music Workers? No! I won't give up. I'll reinstall and get back at the drawing board. So see you soon guys.
And yeah, wish me luck! I think I'm gonna need it.
« Last Edit: January 03, 2016, 12:07:34 pm by Roger Peartree »

Offline Roger Peartree

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Damn it! I write too much... Gotta stop doing these thick walls of text! Sorry guys...  :-\

Offline darthlukan

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That black screen with the dead cursor is TTY7, where the X server is supposed to be displaying your desktop login interface. That means that your graphics stack got messed up at some point in your installation of the other packages. To fix it, you'll need to do the following:

1. Press CTRL+ALT+F2
2. At the prompt, login as your regular user
3. execute the following command to see why X didn't start up successfully:
Code: [Select]
$ cat /var/log/Xorg.0.log | grep EE

In the Xorg.0.log file, EE means Error, WW means Warning, and II (two capital "i"'s) means Info.  Alternatively, you can do:

Code: [Select]
$ cat /var/log/Xorg.0.log | less

That will allow you to read the entire file in a scrollable interface, you can use up and down arrows or Vi bindings to scroll through the entire file.

Once you've seen the errors in the Xorg.0.log file, please let us know what they are and we can get your display working again.
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Offline Roger Peartree

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Wow @darthlukan many thanks! I still have the Peppermint 6 installation as it was so let me try your solution. Thanks a lot, you rock! Cheers.

Offline Roger Peartree

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Well there's no Xorg.0.log file at /var. But when you open var/lightdm you'll find x-0.log with the following data: X: cannot stat /etc/X11/X (No such file or directory), aborting. Then you have x-0-greeter.log with zero data (blank file on geany or mousepad) and then you get the lightdm.log which gives this output data:
Code: [Select]
.00s] DEBUG: Logging to /var/log/lightdm/lightdm.log
[+0.00s] DEBUG: Starting Light Display Manager 1.10.6, UID=0 PID=1293
[+0.00s] DEBUG: Loading configuration dirs from /usr/share/lightdm/lightdm.conf.d
[+0.00s] DEBUG: Loading configuration from /usr/share/lightdm/lightdm.conf.d/50-greeter-wrapper.conf
[+0.00s] DEBUG: Loading configuration from /usr/share/lightdm/lightdm.conf.d/50-guest-wrapper.conf
[+0.00s] DEBUG: Loading configuration from /usr/share/lightdm/lightdm.conf.d/50-xserver-command.conf
[+0.00s] DEBUG: Loading configuration from /usr/share/lightdm/lightdm.conf.d/60-lightdm-gtk-greeter.conf
[+0.00s] DEBUG: Loading configuration dirs from /usr/local/share/lightdm/lightdm.conf.d
[+0.00s] DEBUG: Loading configuration dirs from /etc/xdg/lightdm/lightdm.conf.d
[+0.00s] DEBUG: Loading configuration from /etc/lightdm/lightdm.conf.d/20-peppermint.conf
[+0.00s] DEBUG: Loading configuration from /etc/lightdm/lightdm.conf
[+0.00s] DEBUG: Using D-Bus name org.freedesktop.DisplayManager
[+0.00s] DEBUG: Registered seat module xlocal
[+0.00s] DEBUG: Registered seat module xremote
[+0.00s] DEBUG: Registered seat module unity
[+0.00s] DEBUG: Registered seat module surfaceflinger
[+0.02s] DEBUG: Adding default seat
[+0.02s] DEBUG: Seat: Starting
[+0.02s] DEBUG: Seat: Creating greeter session
[+0.04s] DEBUG: Seat: Creating display server of type x
[+0.05s] DEBUG: Deactivating Plymouth
[+0.08s] DEBUG: Using VT 7
[+0.08s] DEBUG: Seat: Starting local X display on VT 7
[+0.08s] DEBUG: DisplayServer x-0: Logging to /var/log/lightdm/x-0.log
[+0.08s] DEBUG: DisplayServer x-0: Writing X server authority to /var/run/lightdm/root/:0
[+0.08s] DEBUG: DisplayServer x-0: Launching X Server
[+0.09s] DEBUG: Launching process 1324: /usr/bin/X -core :0 -seat seat0 -auth /var/run/lightdm/root/:0 -nolisten tcp vt7 -novtswitch
[+0.09s] DEBUG: DisplayServer x-0: Waiting for ready signal from X server :0
[+0.09s] DEBUG: Acquired bus name org.freedesktop.DisplayManager
[+0.09s] DEBUG: Registering seat with bus path /org/freedesktop/DisplayManager/Seat0
[+0.09s] DEBUG: Process 1324 exited with return value 1
[+0.09s] DEBUG: DisplayServer x-0: X server stopped
[+0.09s] DEBUG: Releasing VT 7
[+0.09s] DEBUG: DisplayServer x-0: Removing X server authority /var/run/lightdm/root/:0
[+0.09s] DEBUG: Quitting Plymouth
[+34.93s] DEBUG: Seat: Display server stopped
[+34.93s] DEBUG: Seat: Stopping; greeter display server failed to start
[+34.93s] DEBUG: Seat: Stopping
[+34.93s] DEBUG: Seat: Stopping session
[+34.93s] DEBUG: Seat: Session stopped
[+34.93s] DEBUG: Seat: Stopped
[+34.93s] DEBUG: Required seat has stopped
[+34.93s] DEBUG: Stopping display manager
[+34.93s] DEBUG: Display manager stopped
[+34.93s] DEBUG: Stopping daemon
[+34.93s] DEBUG: Seat: Stopping session
[+35.14s] DEBUG: Loading users from org.freedesktop.Accounts
[+35.14s] DEBUG: User /org/freedesktop/Accounts/User1000 added
[+35.34s] DEBUG: Exiting with return value 1
« Last Edit: January 03, 2016, 01:12:24 pm by AndyInMokum »

Offline Roger Peartree

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Since I can't log in to Peppermint and get a terminal working, all that data was from doing: sudo thunar var (on the mounted sda3 media which is the Peppermint install) and then opening files with mousepad, from my Xubuntu 15.10, sda1 installation.

Offline darthlukan

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Since I can't log in to Peppermint and get a terminal working, all that data was from doing: sudo thunar var (on the mounted sda3 media which is the Peppermint install) and then opening files with mousepad, from my Xubuntu 15.10, sda1 installation.

/var/log is a directory, there should be an Xorg.0.log file in there. I need to see it to verify something, though "X: cannot stat /etc/X11/X (No such file or directory), aborting." That is worrying, it means that X is not installed.

I know you can't login to Peppermint in the traditional way, that's why I gave you those instructions. Peppermint is booting up and is working, just headless. When you bootup and you get to the black screen with the blinking cursor, press CTRL+ALT+F2 and login. You'll get a TTY login prompt from there, we just have to reinstall xorg (X server) and you'll be back in business.

Here are the steps:

1. Boot Peppermint
2. At the black screen with the white curser, press CTRL+ALT+F2
3. You'll be at a TTY login prompt, login as your regular user
4. You'll now be logged into a terminal session (no GUI still), execute "sudo su" to become root
5. Enter the following so that we can see what was installed and removed by the ubuntu studio related packages: cat /var/log/apt/term.log >> /home/USER/apt-log.txt
6. Enter the following: # apt-get update && apt-get install xserver-xorg-lts-trusty xserver-xorg-input-all-lts-trusty xserver-xorg-video-all-lts-trusty
7. Once the installation is finished: # service lightdm start

If all goes well, then you should see the lightdm greeter and be able to login as normal. If not, place the errors here so that I can see what's happening.

NOTE: At step 5, you can substitute xserver-xorg-video-all-lts-trusty if you use different video drivers and don't want to have every X video driver on your system
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Offline Roger Peartree

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Many thanks darthlukan for bearing with me. Wow! i must say that Peppermint Forum support from Gurus like you is one of the best I've seen so far! In general the Internet Linux Community are outstanding because they really help noobs and intermediate users like me. That's something that Windows can't really boast about hehehe! Ok, so your instructions are very clear and now I know what to do to get back the Xorg server working. Sorry I was kind of dumb not seeing that I could run the TTY login prompt. I'm not the smartest tool on the shed, many thanks for bearing with my dumbness.
So I'll reboot from Xubuntu 15.10 and I'll do:
1. Boot Peppermint
2. At the black screen with the white curser, press CTRL+ALT+F2
3. You'll be at a TTY login prompt, login as your regular user
4. You'll now be logged into a terminal session (no GUI still), execute "sudo su" to become root
5. Enter the following so that we can see what was installed and removed by the ubuntu studio related packages: cat /var/log/apt/term.log >> /home/USER/apt-log.txt
6. Enter the following: # apt-get update && apt-get install xserver-xorg-lts-trusty xserver-xorg-input-all-lts-trusty xserver-xorg-video-all-lts-trusty
7. Once the installation is finished: # service lightdm start

If all goes well, then you should see the lightdm greeter and be able to login as normal. If not, place the errors here so that I can see what's happening.

NOTE: At step 5, you can substitute xserver-xorg-video-all-lts-trusty if you use different video drivers and don't want to have every X video driver on your system

Will get back at you after getting X back in Peppermint. Now it's Family dinner time, would be sacrilege to fail that table. But I'll do your steps before going to Dinner so I'll get something from that. May take sometime before I get back here but I'll try not to waste your precious time.
By being back here from my Android device with Google Remote Desktop to try and do stuff from the dinner table. Hahaha. Family first man.

Offline darthlukan

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Re: Peppermint 6 as the base for the real time kernel with ubuntu-studio-audio
« Reply #10 on: January 03, 2016, 01:40:23 pm »
Will get back at you after getting X back in Peppermint. Now it's Family dinner time, would be sacrilege to fail that table. But I'll do your steps before going to Dinner so I'll get something from that. May take sometime before I get back here but I'll try not to waste your precious time.
By being back here from my Android device with Google Remote Desktop to try and do stuff from the dinner table. Hahaha. Family first man.

No worries. When you enter the command where I have you create apt-log.txt, you won't see any output, but it creates a log file that, once you're up and running, you can attach to the thread so that we can have some information regarding what your apt steps were and what apt did to cause X to go away, it's so that we can possibly write a safeguard that keeps that sort of thing from happening to other users in the future.
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Offline PCNetSpec

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Re: Peppermint 6 as the base for the real time kernel with ubuntu-studio-audio
« Reply #11 on: January 03, 2016, 01:55:18 pm »
Quote
no way Synaptic will be able to fix the broken package, you have that option on the menu but it won't work
is this the ttf-mscorefonts-installer issue ?

if so, purge that package:
Code: [Select]
sudo apt-get remove --purge ttf-mscorefonts-installer
then reinstall it manually
Code: [Select]
sudo apt-get install ttf-mscorefonts-installer
pesonally the first thing I do after a peppermint installation is install both the lubuntu and ubuntu restricted extras packages which pull in ttf-mscorefonts-installer anyway (so I never run into this issue in the first place):
Code: [Select]
sudo apt-get install lubuntu-restricted-extras ubuntu-restricted-extras
WARNING: You are logged into reality as 'root' .. logging in as 'insane' is the only safe option.

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PCNetSpec

Offline Roger Peartree

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Re: Peppermint 6 as the base for the real time kernel with ubuntu-studio-audio
« Reply #12 on: January 05, 2016, 10:13:31 am »
To PcNetSpec: yes that was the ttf-mscorefonts-installer issue, an error that, thanks to your reply, I avoided in my 2nd installation from scratch of Peppermint 6 32 bit, by doing as you said and installing the lubuntu and ubuntu restricted extras. Many thanks for that.
To darthlukan: Wait... did I say "my 2nd installation from scratch...". Yep. I had to do it. And here's why and what I found out about the missing Xserver/Xorg  packages: so I went on to proceed as you said to open a TTY prompt at the blank init page with the cursor but when I booted Peppermint after dinner the blinking cursor was gone! Go figure... And so ctrl+alt+F2 didn't work anymore. I then rebooted into the Peppermint recovery options, went to network to enable it and then dropped into a root shell. From there I installed the xserver related packages exactly as you told me. Then rebooted and I got as far as getting the Peppermint plymouth theme. After that there was only darkness. So I decided that I had done something wrong in the first place and reinstalled Peppermint 6 from scratch, overwriting the previous installation. I didn't mind because Peppermint installs in around 20 minutes (less in a faster computer). Then I retraced my steps, avoiding the ttf-mscorefonts-installer issue above, went through my customizations but this time I used the 3.16-57 low latency kernel, same version as Peppermint's generic kernel, dropping for now my intention of using the 4.2-23 low latency kernel (but don't worry, I'll do that later). But the problem was not the kernel or the customizations. Turns out that Synaptic played a really nasty trick on me the first time. I trust a lot in Synaptic, to me is an essential piece of software because sometimes you don't remember all the package names at the terminal, so when Synaptic tells me that there are unused residual configuration files I get rid of them. The first time I trusted Synaptic blindly and selected them all and sent them to kingdom come.
Bad idea! I'll tell you some of the names of those files: xserver-xorg, xserver-xorg-core, xserver-xorg-video-intel, etc. So when I purged those configuration files Synaptic removed the xserver directories, with packages in them, or those configuration files were essential to let the system know about the current status of xserver-xorg. I think the first explanation is the correct one, it removed the directories with everything inside them.
Well this is the first time that Synaptic pulls that stunt on me! I love Linux because we keep learning with it, no matter what we choose to do.
You can add this bug solution to my wishlist. I was running Linux Mint 17.2 Xfce in October and it didn't have this bug. Also Xubuntu doesn't have it. I don't know about Lubuntu. You're probably testing the Lubuntu 16.04 Alpha 1 right now so it means you're really busy but this issue can be addressed in future Peppermint updates. In the meantime I'm gonna test the relevant audio and midi software packages and I think I might install the 4.2-23 low latency kernel just to see if it works without bugs. I know that you being a dev, that information will come in handy, for future planning. I can tell you that the Xfce 4.12 components (pulled from the xfce 4.12 devs PPA) work without any bugs and are very stable indeed (and faster too, the windows are more responsive). Well darthlukan, my friend, here's this weekend adventure. I'll get back here with further information but only if I think it's relevant for the Peppermint 6 Music Works project. I can't thank you enough for all your support. And I can't tell you how anxiously I'll wait for the Peppermint 7 release, after Lubuntu 16.04 and Linux Mint 18 do their thing. Let's toast to that! To the future of Peppermint!
« Last Edit: January 06, 2016, 09:23:54 am by Roger Peartree »