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Author Topic: Adding Another Shell to a Distribution: How Would This Affect CPU & RAM?(SOLVED)  (Read 2193 times)

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Offline perknh

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Fellow Pepperminters,

This is a bit of a theory and practice discussion and question.

I've read, back when I was using playing around with Ubuntu Unity's 12.04 interface, that adding a LXDE, or an Xfce, shell to Unity's desktop can actually lighten the system's CPU and memory requirements -- that doing this can actually speed up the computer.

Is this claim true?   Now, this idea came from an Ubuntu forum  -- so we know the claim may be suspect!  There were comments for and against.

My question is:   if a shell is really light and fast, can it speed up the distribution it is sitting upon, or will it always eat up more CPU and memory than native shell of the original distribution itself?

It does seem counter intuitive that adding something extra can actually lighten and speed up the native distribution, but maybe adding another shell, for all I know, could speed up a distribution.  I really don't know.  Maybe it would be like having two cars in the garage instead of only one.  It is certain that when you have two different kinds of cars, one car would certainly be faster than the other.  But, then I think this analogy is not perfect.  Maybe it's more like rotating the a hub within a train yard.  Now you have to move the hub for two train tracks instead of only one, and that would use more system resources-- if that analogy makes any sense.

 :-\

Thank you,

perknh
« Last Edit: May 14, 2014, 09:49:42 am by perknh »
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Offline rjm65

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Re: Adding a Shell to a Desktop Environment: Its Effects on CPU & RAM
« Reply #1 on: May 14, 2014, 08:54:14 am »
when I was working with my old toshiba a Pentium 2 300mhz and 128 megs ram I was playing with antix on it and antix was booting using about 75 megs ram with the standard DE but antix had DE choices in it...  when you booted from live cd you could change to any of 6 de's I chose the lightest one which was jwm de and it went from using 75 megs down to about 28 megs on bootup.... so yes they can make the machine lighter and run faster....
Robert
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Gateway Solo 9300 Pro
IBM T40

Offline perknh

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Thank you, rjm65. 

So far for me, the fastest, and most functional DE, I've ever seen is LXDE right here at Peppermint.

But what you experienced, when you were playing around with antiX, is just amazing.

Thanks, rjm65, for telling me about that, and I just realized you solved the question.

 8)

Thank you.

perknh
« Last Edit: May 14, 2014, 09:48:50 am by perknh »
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Offline rjm65

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LXDE is very lite in fact on my old toshiba I hated the jwm DE, so what I did was went into antix's metapackage installer and installed LXDE Lite, it uses about 11 megs more ram then jwm, but I like LXDE so much I didn't care about the extra 11 megs on that system....
Robert
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Gateway Solo 9300 Pro
IBM T40

Offline perknh

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Right, who care about an extra 11 megs on the system?   I hear you!

rjm65, f it wasn't for LXDE, the Peppermint User's Guide, and the people here who are my teachers for Linux in this Peppermint forum, I could have never, managed the leap from Windows to Linux.

I believe LXDE, and Peppermint OS in particular, is the best place for anyone to begin with Linux -- even better than Ubuntu.

What I don't understand is why DistroWatch.com doesn't list Peppermint as a good beginners Linux distribution, as well as a good Linux distribution for users at all levels of expertise. 

I believe that oversight at DistroWatch hurts Peppermint OS from increasing its user base.  How that is corrected, I do not know.

But for now, let's hear it for LXDE, and for Peppermint's rendition of LXDE.  It works right out of the box. 

Peppermint's rendition of LXDE rocks!   :)

perknh

We're all Peppermint users and that's what matters  ;).  -- AndyInMokum