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Offline carpecanem

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(Solved?) post reduced to: power management settings
« on: November 14, 2015, 12:38:40 pm »
Hello once again,

I set the Power Management settings so that it should shut down the notebook when the battery level is "critical". Unfortunately, that never happens. Instead, the netbook suddenly stops operating because there is no more power left. That's not good for the battery and has the potential to distroy the installation.

Today I had this case. When I boot, I get a black screen after the BIOS screen and the notebook's LEDs go crazy. At the next boot, I get  the "command line menu", and from one of the sub-menus I can successfully boot an older kernel (it's the one with 52 at the end) and everything works fine. But maybe that's because there was a a problem with configuring the .53 kernel during auto-update. So I'm not sure whether this is another problem or a result of the power issue. I have removed the .53 version using the software manager.

It seems that the boot partition has an error, the disk tool stopped with "error value 1" or something when I chose the option to check the file systems from one of the "command line menus". Interestingly I am able to boot the system from the older kernel. Is there a way or a tool to comletely rebuild the boot partition? I once had a similar problem under Windows: a "power off shutdown" did something bad to the boot sector. No tool that could repair it, because they couldn't handle the error. I already started to believe that it was a hardware error. But then I overwrote the whole disk with junk data, but on a sector basis, and the problem was gone. I do have a clone of the boot partition, not very up to date, shall I try to restore it or will the system run into trouble, mess up my settings etc.?

And finally, how can I change my Power Settings? After reading some posts I suppose the problem is that the power manager is set to a time value, which is obviously unreliable (which I can tell from the fantasy values that it claims that the battery will still last). A changement to a percentage value should improve the situation, because it does not involve speculation regarding future power consumption. At least I want to change the critical power level. Unfortunately, there is no "advanced" tab in my installation of the xfce4(?) power manager. So I rely on the help of the forum community once again. Is there a setting which I can change manually to alter the critical level, and is this all that has to be done? After reading some posts I suspect that maybe the power manager itself doesn't do anything and has to be kind of "activated", even though it's installed and pretends to work.

Regards, Mike

Edit: Content reduced to power management. New post for kernel topic.
« Last Edit: November 14, 2015, 04:47:13 pm by carpecanem »

Offline AndyInMokum

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Re: Power management settings, defective boot sector and kernel versions
« Reply #1 on: November 14, 2015, 02:41:28 pm »
Hi carpecanem I can't really give much help in regards to the kernel issues you're having.  It might help if you could let us see what you have installed.  Run the following command in a terminal window:
Code: [Select]
dpkg -l | grep linux-image
Post the output back to the forum.

As for the power management.  I have two laptops.  A Fujitsu-Siemens AMILO li-3710 Notebook and an Acer Aspire One ZG5.  I have never been able to get the auto critical shutdown to work on them.  This is using both the MATE Power Manager and the previously used, Xfce4 Power Manager.  Power management software in Linux is a joke.  It's basically broken and no one knows or can't be bothered to fix it.  If it work, you're one of the lucky ones.  If it doesn't, well you're in good company.  The Peppermint Team only chose the MATE Power Management because on the machines we tested.  It was the lesser of all the evils >:D!  So I don't hold up much hope you'll get it working satisfactorily.  I hope this saves you banging your head unnecessarily against a wall  ;).
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Offline PCNetSpec

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Re: Power management settings, defective boot sector and kernel versions
« Reply #2 on: November 14, 2015, 02:55:03 pm »
OK I'm totally lost with the above .. I'm not even sure if it's booting or not  :-\

Can we start again with a SINGLE issue per topic please .. pick the most important one and start a new topic, then move onto the next

After you start a new topic, I'll delete this one.
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Offline carpecanem

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Re: Power management settings, defective boot sector and kernel versions
« Reply #3 on: November 14, 2015, 04:50:38 pm »
Can we start again with a SINGLE issue per topic please .. pick the most important one and start a new topic, then move onto the next

After you start a new topic, I'll delete this one.

I started a new topic for the kernel issue and reduced this one to power management.

Offline carpecanem

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Re: Power management settings, defective boot sector and kernel versions
« Reply #4 on: November 14, 2015, 04:59:50 pm »
Power management software in Linux is a joke.  It's basically broken and no one knows or can't be bothered to fix it.  If it work, you're one of the lucky ones.  If it doesn't, well you're in good company.

Well... em... not well. Is it now justified to say that not only Windows developers are ignorant of users' needs  :D

So I fear there is no workaround?

Offline PCNetSpec

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Re: (Solved?) post reduced to: power management settings
« Reply #5 on: November 14, 2015, 05:32:51 pm »
There MAY be a fix...

Switching to the xfce4-power-manager works for some people .. you might want to read this topic
http://forum.peppermintos.com/index.php/topic,2599.msg25553.html#msg25553
any questions, please post them here ;)

If that doesn't work, there MAY be a couple of other things we can try.



What Andy meant was there doesn't seem to be a one size fits all solution under Linux

In fact there isn't in Windows either .. hardware manufacturers release buggy ACPI implementations, BIOS aut hors then add patches the the BIOS to make them work under Windows .. they're (currently) less likely to do the same for Linux (by default Linux reports itself as "Windows" to the BIOS  and most of the time this works to varying degrees, occasionally you can tell Linux to report itself as "Linux" to the BIOS and if the authors added some Linux specific patches this might help) .. it's not that Microsoft are particularly doing something "right", it's more that the hardware manufacturers/BIOS authors are doing something wrong, so there's no working "standard" to stick to (even though there's *supposed* to be).
then there's the hardware manufaturers who historically have had a habit of keeping their drivers closed source and secret, making it harder for open sourced drivers to be written that take advantage of all the power saving functions.

See here for a slightly clearer explanation:
https://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/119606/why-does-linux-have-poor-battery-life-by-default-compared-to-windows

As you can see, it's not Microsoft that's doing a good job, it's simply the hardware manufacturers being secretive .. Linux power management has come on in leaps and bounds lately, but is still (currently) at a disadvantage .. it's getting there though as manufacturers are taking Linux into account more, they may not be open sourcing their drivers, but most are now releasing Linux drivers (that are closing quickly on feature parity with their Windows drivers) and/or  are working with the Linux kernel devs.
« Last Edit: November 14, 2015, 06:17:01 pm by PCNetSpec »
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Offline AndyInMokum

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Re: Power management settings, defective boot sector and kernel versions
« Reply #6 on: December 11, 2015, 02:38:38 pm »
Hi carpecanem I can't really give much help in regards to the kernel issues you're having.  It might help if you could let us see what you have installed.  Run the following command in a terminal window:
Code: [Select]
dpkg -l | grep linux-image
Backup! Backup! Backup! If you're missing any of these -  you ain't Backed Up!
For my system info please L/click HERE.