Choose style:

Author Topic: What is Best Practices & Planning of Linux partitioning During Installation  (Read 2223 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline rajeev2631007

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 234
  • Karma: 24
  • New Forum User
    • View Profile
I want to learn and understand How can I plan Linux partition during installation. I have two real life scenarios I think over it right now when I do dual boot between Linux and Windows and other one is when I install Linux standalone. It should be easy to re-install or upgrade OS or Some issue with OS and our important data should be save when I am doing such things. No need to re-install application if OS re-install or upgrade with same distro. What is best practices for the same.

Scenario:Dual Boot with Windows

Partition Type      Required or Not    File System     Recommended Mini. &
                                                                                            Max. Size


1./Boot                                       
2./Root
3./Swap
4./home
5./Data
6.Any other


Scenario:Standalone Linux

Partition Type      Required or Not    File System  Recommended Mini.
                                                                                         & Max. Size

                                                     
1./Boot
2./Root
3./Swap
4./Home
5./Data
6.Any other

I request you please give your input if I had missed something in this case.

Regards,

Rajeev Gautam

Offline AndyInMokum

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero
  • *****
  • Posts: 4808
  • Karma: 1011
  • "Keep on Rockin' in the Free World"
    • View Profile
  • Peppermint version(s): PM 9 & PM 8 Respin-2 (64-bit)
Re: What is Best Practices & Planning of Linux partitioning During Installation
« Reply #1 on: September 19, 2015, 02:41:55 pm »
Hi rajeev2631007, how's it going?  This is what I would do based on a 500GB HHD and 2GB of RAM  For the Linux partitions you only need to do this:
  • /root between 20GB - 30GB or 20,480MiB - 30,720MiB, File system ext4
  • /swap 2x RAM = 4GB or 4,096MiB
  • /mnt/DATA 466GB or 477,184MiB, File system ext4, (based on /root being 30GB)
For dual booting, make the partitions like this:
  • /root between 20GB -30GB or 20,480MiB - 30,720MiB, File system ext4
  • /swap 2x RAM = 4GB or 4,096MiB
  • Windows 30GB or 30,720MiB, File system NTFS
  • /mnt/DATA 436GB or 446,464MiB, File system NTFS, (based on /root being 30GB)
You don't need all those extra partitions for a desktop.  Your critical data is going to be stored in both scenarios on the /mnt/DATA partition connected with symlinks.  With the dual boot the /mnt/DATA partition is going to be a shared partition for both Linux and Windows.  I hope this makes sense to you  ;).
Backup! Backup! Backup! If you're missing any of these -  you ain't Backed Up!
For my system info please L/click HERE.

Offline PCNetSpec

  • Administrator
  • Hero
  • *****
  • Posts: 24444
  • Karma: 2698
  • "-rw-rw-rw-" .. The Number Of The Beast
    • View Profile
    • PCNetSpec
  • Peppermint version(s): Peppermint 8R, 9, and 9R
Re: What is Best Practices & Planning of Linux partitioning During Installation
« Reply #2 on: September 19, 2015, 04:48:18 pm »
I'm with Andy, I can see no benefit (in most cases) to a separate /boot partition, and if you're going to have a separate /data partition and use symlinks from your Home directory to save personal data there I can also see no benefit to a separate /home.

in fact unless you're using something that'll allow you to dynamically resize them, they're actually a liability.

I did say "most cases" though .. I mean obviously things like a webserver that's serving from /var/www might want that on a separate partition.

Point is there are really no all encompassing "best practices" to partitioning .. it depends greatly on what you're going to be using the machine for, what combination of SSD/HDD, whether performance, longevity, flexibility, ease of backup, etc. are your priorities .. heck even the age of your disks might make a difference to what suits you.

[EDIT]

If you're planning to use LVM or a flexible file system such as ZFS may also play a big part in your choices .. as will if you're ever likely to be moving data and disks between machines, and a million and one other variables.

"Best practice" is whatever's best for YOU......
« Last Edit: September 19, 2015, 04:55:21 pm by PCNetSpec »
WARNING: You are logged into reality as 'root' .. logging in as 'insane' is the only safe option.

Team Peppermint
PCNetSpec

Offline emegra

  • Global Moderator
  • Veteran
  • *****
  • Posts: 1839
  • Karma: 402
  • New Forum User
    • View Profile
  • Peppermint version(s): Peppermint 9 64bit
Re: What is Best Practices & Planning of Linux partitioning During Installation
« Reply #3 on: September 19, 2015, 05:49:50 pm »
I'm a believer in letting the installer do it's own thing whether it's an installation along side another operating system or using the entire disc, I've never seen the point in a separate /home partition although a separate data partition isn't a bad idea 



Graeme
If you can keep your head while all around are losing theirs then you're not quite grasping the situation

Offline rajeev2631007

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 234
  • Karma: 24
  • New Forum User
    • View Profile
Re: What is Best Practices & Planning of Linux partitioning During Installation
« Reply #4 on: September 20, 2015, 12:27:43 am »
In beginning “Best Practice” is that experience people of area do or take step for any work or routine and when you become experience "Best practice" is whatever's best for YOU.....

Quote

My critical data is going to be stored in both scenarios on the /mnt/DATA partition connected with symlinks.

This term symlinks or symbolic link is new to me. It sounds like shortcut of file and folder in windows. It is more then that I think. You are talking about Link /home folder to /mnt/DATA partition. If I store data in home folder it is actual saving in /mnt/DATA.

After googled I found it has Two types as below:-

symbolic links: Refer to a symbolic path indicating the abstract location of another file
hard links : Refer to the specific location of physical data. 


To create a symbolic link in Linux, at the shell prompt, enter the following command:
ln -s {target-filename} {symbolic-filename}


In our scenario it is soft link or hard link?

ln –s /mnt/DATA /home or ln –P /mnt/DATA /home

Note:-P, --physical make hard links directly to symbolic links


Is there any GUI way to do it the same?


One more thing In case of Dual boots which OS Install First (Window than Linux or Linux than Window). I think I can’t format NTFS partition with Linux during installation.

Please correct me, if understand is wrong.

Thanks for sharing your experience with me.

Regards,
Rajeev Gautam

Offline AndyInMokum

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero
  • *****
  • Posts: 4808
  • Karma: 1011
  • "Keep on Rockin' in the Free World"
    • View Profile
  • Peppermint version(s): PM 9 & PM 8 Respin-2 (64-bit)
Re: What is Best Practices & Planning of Linux partitioning During Installation
« Reply #5 on: September 20, 2015, 04:34:14 am »
HI rajeev2631007, how's it going?  In my opinion, using the separate DATA partition in both scenarios is very wise.  It will significantly simplify re-installation of your OSs and OS upgrades.  It is still highly advisable to make a backup of your DATA partition when re-installing or upgrading your OSs.  This is purely precautionary; your data is valuable  ;)

When just using Peppermint Six.  The DATA partition can be formatted to use the ext4 file system.  In a dual boot with Windows.  The DATA partition must be formatted to use the NTFS file system.  This is because Linux can read and write to an NTFS file system.  Windows cannot see an ext4 file system.  The links being used, are symlinks also called symbolic links or soft links.  It's more common see them referred to as symlinks.  These have been fully available to Windows users since the release of Windows Vista.  The use of symlinks is awesome - they rock  8).  For more information on how to setup a DATA partition with symlinks, our Trusted User, Slim.Fatz has written a very comprehensive tutorial:  How To: Use symlinks to a DATA partition

As far as I know, there is no GUI, (Graphical User Interface) to create symlinks.  There's no need for one because the process is very simple to perform using the CLI, (Command Line Interface). 

When creating a dual boot system.  Windows must always be installed first.  The Windows installer assumes that you will only be using Windows and wipes the whole drive before it installs.

I recommend  you use the very powerful and easy to use partitioning tool GParted to format your DATA partition.  Yes, you're able to format a partition to NTFS during the Peppermint Six installation.  At least as far as I can remember you can.  I never use the Ubiquity installer's partitioning tool.  I always make my partitions using GParted before I installed the OS; it's much simpler.  I then tell the installer not to format the partitions when I'm choosing the mount points.  GParted is available in the Live version of Peppermint Six.  If you want to use GParted after you've installed the distro.  You must install it yourself from the repository.  That's really all there is to it.  The next thing to do is choose which scenario you're going to use and install it - good luck and have fun  ;)!!
« Last Edit: September 20, 2015, 04:36:51 am by AndyInMokum »
Backup! Backup! Backup! If you're missing any of these -  you ain't Backed Up!
For my system info please L/click HERE.

Offline PCNetSpec

  • Administrator
  • Hero
  • *****
  • Posts: 24444
  • Karma: 2698
  • "-rw-rw-rw-" .. The Number Of The Beast
    • View Profile
    • PCNetSpec
  • Peppermint version(s): Peppermint 8R, 9, and 9R
Re: What is Best Practices & Planning of Linux partitioning During Installation
« Reply #6 on: September 20, 2015, 05:19:34 am »
Hard links can only be made on the same volume .. so you want softlinks.

YES they can be created through the file manager .. right-click the file/folder you want to link to, and select "Make Link"

You can now move that link wherever you want and rename it if you choose .. it will always point back to the original.
WARNING: You are logged into reality as 'root' .. logging in as 'insane' is the only safe option.

Team Peppermint
PCNetSpec

Offline AndyInMokum

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero
  • *****
  • Posts: 4808
  • Karma: 1011
  • "Keep on Rockin' in the Free World"
    • View Profile
  • Peppermint version(s): PM 9 & PM 8 Respin-2 (64-bit)
Re: What is Best Practices & Planning of Linux partitioning During Installation
« Reply #7 on: September 20, 2015, 05:32:53 am »
Quote
YES they can be created through the file manager .. right-click the file/folder you want to link to, and select "Make Link" - PCNetSpec
I didn't know this.  I've learnt something new today :o!
Backup! Backup! Backup! If you're missing any of these -  you ain't Backed Up!
For my system info please L/click HERE.

Offline rajeev2631007

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 234
  • Karma: 24
  • New Forum User
    • View Profile
Re: What is Best Practices & Planning of Linux partitioning During Installation
« Reply #8 on: September 20, 2015, 05:40:57 am »
I can say one thing you people are awesome

After Joining is forum I'm learning everyday somthing new...................

Thanks for sharing and caring.

Regards,

Rajeev Gautam

Offline PCNetSpec

  • Administrator
  • Hero
  • *****
  • Posts: 24444
  • Karma: 2698
  • "-rw-rw-rw-" .. The Number Of The Beast
    • View Profile
    • PCNetSpec
  • Peppermint version(s): Peppermint 8R, 9, and 9R
Re: What is Best Practices & Planning of Linux partitioning During Installation
« Reply #9 on: September 20, 2015, 06:26:26 am »
Thanks very much for the kind words Rajeev .. we're here to assist wherever we can :)
WARNING: You are logged into reality as 'root' .. logging in as 'insane' is the only safe option.

Team Peppermint
PCNetSpec

Offline AndyInMokum

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero
  • *****
  • Posts: 4808
  • Karma: 1011
  • "Keep on Rockin' in the Free World"
    • View Profile
  • Peppermint version(s): PM 9 & PM 8 Respin-2 (64-bit)
Re: What is Best Practices & Planning of Linux partitioning During Installation
« Reply #10 on: September 20, 2015, 06:55:08 am »
It's my pleasure  ;D.  I'm glad you're finding the forum useful.  There's always someone here willing to give advice  ;).
Backup! Backup! Backup! If you're missing any of these -  you ain't Backed Up!
For my system info please L/click HERE.

Offline sskarma

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 376
  • Karma: 32
    • View Profile
  • Peppermint version(s): Peppermint 6 32-bit
Re: What is Best Practices & Planning of Linux partitioning During Installation
« Reply #11 on: September 23, 2015, 01:15:15 pm »
Hi, I learnt about linux partitioning only a few weeks ago before installing Peppermint. I only use Linux (no windows). here is my partitions details

Primary - ext4- linux swap - 2.2 GB
primary- ext4 -Peppermint OS- 32 GB
primary- ext4 - puppy linux -11 GB
primary-extended partition- 115 GB
(inside the extended partition, two logical ext4 partitions of 20 GB and 95 GB).

My HDD doesn't allow me to create more than 4 primary partitions. I kept the 20 GB logical partition to experiment and try new distros.

I use the Gparted utility on puppy linux to do partitioning and sometimes Peppermint disks utility to edit my other non-peppermint partitions :)

Offline AndyInMokum

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero
  • *****
  • Posts: 4808
  • Karma: 1011
  • "Keep on Rockin' in the Free World"
    • View Profile
  • Peppermint version(s): PM 9 & PM 8 Respin-2 (64-bit)
Re: What is Best Practices & Planning of Linux partitioning During Installation
« Reply #12 on: September 23, 2015, 07:51:28 pm »
Hi rajeev2631007, that's great, you've found out about the limitations of the MBR and how to make an extended partition to overcome them.  GParted is an awesome piece of software.  Some of the purists say it's for wimps and the only way to set up partitions is by the CLI with fdisk.  I must be one of those wimps because I love GParted.  It's always one of the first things I install.  I even have it as a separate Live installation on a thumb drive  ;).
Backup! Backup! Backup! If you're missing any of these -  you ain't Backed Up!
For my system info please L/click HERE.

Offline rajeev2631007

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 234
  • Karma: 24
  • New Forum User
    • View Profile
Re: What is Best Practices & Planning of Linux partitioning During Installation
« Reply #13 on: September 25, 2015, 07:26:48 am »
Thank Your very much everybody for sharing.

Regards,

Rajeev Gautam