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Author Topic: Google removes "always listening" code from Chromium  (Read 1318 times)

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Online VinDSL

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Google removes "always listening" code from Chromium
« on: June 27, 2015, 10:13:29 am »
"After including closed-source code that enabled Chromium to listen in to a computer's microphone, Google bowed to backlash and removed it from the open-source browser." ~ ZDNet 25-June-2015

LINK:  http://www.zdnet.com/article/google-removes-always-listening-code-from-chromium/

Offline perknh

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Re: Google removes "always listening" code from Chromium
« Reply #1 on: June 27, 2015, 01:11:30 pm »
This proves the adage (Linus' law) that many eyes (and lots of nudging in this case) make all bugs shallow.

This is good news!  :)

Thanks of telling us.

perknh
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Offline scifidude79

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Re: Google removes "always listening" code from Chromium
« Reply #2 on: June 27, 2015, 01:16:07 pm »
Not that I use Chromium or anything, but this is good news in that open source software needs to be open, not containing proprietary code.  If Google had been allowed to continue including closed source code in Chromium, it would have set a bad precedent.

Offline perknh

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Re: Google removes "always listening" code from Chromium
« Reply #3 on: June 27, 2015, 03:28:26 pm »
Not that I use Chromium or anything, but this is good news in that open source software needs to be open, not containing proprietary code.  If Google had been allowed to continue including closed source code in Chromium, it would have set a bad precedent.

Yes, you make a good point:  It does set a bad precedent.  I know Trisquel GNU/LInux has always feared that Chromium browser contained proprietary code, and I believe this has been the primary reason why the developers of Trisquel would not allow Chromium browser into its repository.  This episode of Chromium's "always listening code" seems to ha!ve proven Trisquel's point --that Chromium did contain proprietary code!  I wonder how Trisquel will behave now that this matter is being resolved.  :-\

I should state, that I've never gotten Trisquel to function on my computer --on a flash drive, yes, but on my computer, no!  But, Trisquel is Richard Stallman's personal distribution of choice.  I wonder now if Chromium will make its way into Trisquel's repository.  My guess is that it won't make it there yet, but this will be something to keep an eye on.  Chromium's Trisquel Acid Test --the ultimate test of open source browser purity!  ;D
« Last Edit: June 28, 2015, 09:06:00 am by perknh »
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